23 More Distinguished TSA Scholars

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Mike, Sep 7, 2012.

  1. FaustsAccountant

    FaustsAccountant Original Member

    "A little knowledge is a dangerous thing."

    Just because some slackjaw figured out to peel a bandaid doesn't mean he's qualified to do heart transplant.
     
  2. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    I can only comment on the relative intelligence of the group I have worked and studied with. If she did any research at all, she would have been ahead of 90% of the US populace, biased POV or not. I have done enough research on the LAG to know that while it is a possibility, it is a remote possibility. Both sides of any issue cloud the air with their "focused" research and results. I like to be educated on both sides of the issues, which is one of the reasons I visit here as often as I do. Sometimes you folks present something I have not thought of, or clarify something that I am uncertain on. English classes do teach research into origins and how to properly place things in perspective, but life also has a way of doing that as well. I tend to try and listen to things from every point of view that will give them, regardless of whether I agree or disagree, it makes for a better informed me.
     
  3. Monica47

    Monica47 Original Member

    Do the classes the TSA can take include one on geography because this was just posted on Twitter:

    Katie R@Katie_AK
    TSA, looking @ AK drivers license: You need a US license to go through Me: This IS a US license TSA: OMG please don't post this on Facebook
     
  4. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    The classes include some geographical content, as in where uprisings have happened, how certain methods were perfected/developed in certain regions, but there are no actual Geography lessons included.
     
  5. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Methods of what? Is there a difference in TSA groping "methods" between DEN and ATL, or what?
     
  6. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    Methods of security, methods of intelligence, methods of analysis and the varying forms and changes that all of these have undergone, and directions that may theoretically occur in the future.
     
  7. Frank

    Frank Original Member

    That's what you get when you hire full retards.
     
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  8. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    All of those are completely foreign concepts to the TSA.
     
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  9. FaustsAccountant

    FaustsAccountant Original Member

    Uh-huh.
    Learning the States in the country of United States of America would really be more useful, important and applicable.
    REally. It would. Start there.
     
  10. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    I can't tell if you're being sarcastic or not. The only TSA employees capable of learning are those sociopaths who've learned that the TSA is a perfect fit for them because they're actually ordered to abuse people.
     
  11. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    I can't argue with that point much. I am certain that I can sit down and name all of the states, but I am not certain that all of my friends, family or co-workers could do the same. I can understand this *maybe* if the person was having a bad day and had a stupid moment (face it, we have all had those moments, and sometimes days), however, lack of basic knowledge is difficult to defend.


    (warning, slightly OT rant ahead)
    If this is a serious lack of knowledge, then there is also a case to be made against the education system in general. What is taught in our schools now is not nearly as wide and informative as it was when I went through school, and according to my parents, what I learned in school was not nearly as wide and informative as when they went through. I had a serious talk with my daughter a few years ago when she had a paper due on the Civil War. According to her teacher, and the text book, the Civil War was an uprising based entirely on slavery - which is not true. The slavery issue was one of the biggest issues, but the underlying socioeconomic issues and states rights issues were at least as important from a large picture view. We talked about a lot of that, she did outside research and compiled an extremely informative paper, that was pretty darn good (even if I was a bit biased, I let other people see it - including my history professor from college, and they concur that it was a pretty good paper for a sophomore in high school). She got a C+ because she did not focus on slavery as the only defining factor for the war (this was actually written in the comments at the end of the paper, even though it was not what the question/instructions asked for). We are continually redefining our history as we speak, which has been the case throughout history (really, we are not the first country to do this). Sadly, this makes it more difficult to learn from our past, when we obscure our mistakes through collective disremembrance. We have degenerated from teaching the basics, and escalating to the advanced for those that want to learn more, to teaching for an arbitrary set of questions on a series of tests that have been dumbed down. It is sad really. (steps off soapbox)
     
  12. TravelnMedic

    TravelnMedic Original Member

    Wes -- Agreed the problem with the current education system is testing and standardized testing in general. Teachers are no longer teaching / enriching / broadening students minds with knowledge but teaching to a test that is designed to show "how well a school is performing". Which in turn determines teachers "evaluations" and the money the school district gets from the state and federal government; Its a vicious cycle. If they would get away from this cycle we could better judge the performance of our children/students. The US could take a major hint from the school systems of the UK, HK and Japan as they seem to have a good grasp on things. There is a number of people I went to High School with that are now teachers. Some of the events/stories they have told me are scary as to how low standards have dropped. As well as how parents are enablers or won't listen hear a word other then their child is a genious when in realty is a sharp as a marble.
     
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  13. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I really don't see how increasing ones knowledge in these areas help a typical airport security screener.
     
  14. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    By understanding the process, one can better understand the information you are given and by extension better understand what that information indicates. It can also help raise awareness in general by encouraging you to keep aware of world events. If you are workiing in security, it can help you to be aware of what is trending elsewhere, in case some of the same things begin trending near you. It is like understanding how an engine works, if you understand the principle of how it works in general, then it allows you to better identify the problems that may arise. If A is happening, then results B, C and D may be indicated, and you may need to look for B, C or D happening near you.
     
  15. RB

    RB Founding Member

    None of which has any bearing on screening people and baggage.

    TSA would be better served with training that stressed how to do those things required at the airport and do them properly.
     
  16. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    If they're capable of learning, they'll learn that everything the TSA does is stupid and/or designed only for theatrical effect, and leave for a different job.

    Of course, at the point the only people working for the TSA are there because they either have no other place they can possibly get a job because they're utterly lacking in any useful skills, or they're working for the TSA because they enjoy sticking their hands down people's pants, intimidating them, and stealing from them.

    There's probably also a really small set of people who work for the TSA because they're actually stupid enough to believe that they're doing something "good" for their country. Those are possibly the most dangerous... since they're both stupid *and* earnest.
     
  17. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    How does this affect TSA employees, then? They're not working in "security." They're working in "security theater."
     
  18. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I think TSA should try teaching its employees that the human body has no part named resistance. I realize that is a tall order and TSA employees may lack the skills to understand that point.

    Rugape, does a TSA pat down require a TSA screener to make contact with a mans penis or testicles? How about a law enforcement pat down, seeing as how you have direct knowledge in that matter?
     
  19. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    The description given is resistance, you can ask me that as many times as you like, and it will be the same answer.

    LEO patdowns are different, I have not done them since 1995, but if we were patting someone down for a safety/weapon check, yes we checked private areas because it was an easy place to conceal a weapon and stood a chance of being missed if you did a half assed pat down. If it was a custodial or transport patdown, it was even more invasive.
     
  20. Frank

    Frank Original Member

    That's when you call up the Principal, and you and the Principal and the teacher in question have a discussion in the Principal's office about said teacher's qualification to teach history. And then you go up the chain if there is no resolution.

    Parents need to take responsibility for what their children are being taught in schools. It's not a babysitting service.
     

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