According to New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo, Retired Badges Do Grant Extra Rights

Discussion in 'What's On Your Mind?' started by DavyV., Jun 25, 2013.

  1. DavyV.

    DavyV. Rochester NY Police Corruption Blog

    By Davy V.
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    New York Governor Andrew Cuomo​

    In January, New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law the country's toughest assault weapons ban, in wake of the Newtown Connecticut school massacre.

    Now, the first term Governor says he will sign legislation which will exempt retired police officers from New York's restrictions on large-capacity magazines and guns defined as assault weapons.

    The new legislation, which was passed by the New York State Senate Friday night, would amend the controversial gun law which limits the number of rounds in a magazine to seven, bans large-capacity magazines, bans sales of assault-style weapons and requires federal background checks in private gun sales.

    The exemption would only apply to police officers who bought, or were issued weapons in the course of their duties, and who retired in good standing.

    Simply put, according to New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo, and the New York State Senate, cops are entitled to certain protections and exemptions, that the average, hard working, law-abiding, tax paying citizen IS NOT.




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    The legislation passed Friday says the exemption would apply to officers who bought or were issued restricted weapons in the course of their duties and who retired in good standing.

    They would have to re-qualify for right after they retire and register those guns.

    The law was enacted in January, a month after the Newtown, Conn., school massacre. It generally limits the number of rounds in a magazine to seven, bans large-capacity magazines, bans sales of assault-style weapons and requires federal background checks in private gun sales.

    It requires registration of popular semi-automatics like AR-15s with one military-style feature previously sold legally in New York.




    In late January, New York's Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo signed into law the nation's toughest assault weapons ban, the first gun control legislation passed in the wake of Newtown. But on Wednesday, Cuomo told reporters that he and legislative leaders would reverse one of the bill's most controversial measures, which limited magazines to no more than seven rounds, before the law goes into effect on April 15.

    "There's no such thing as a seven-bullet magazine. That doesn't exist, so you really have no practical option," Cuomo said. Democrats plan to adjust the bill amid other legislative talks so that the new gun law will conform with existing state regulations banning magazines holding more than 10 rounds. Cuomo denied that the change would amount to a "rollback"; instead, he said, it's just a measure to clean up "ambiguities" and "grammatical errors" in the bill. It also appears to be a concession to ammunition manufacturers that potentially would've been hurt by the new law.

    Still, the language on seven-round magazines won't be completely wiped from the bill. Cuomo said that while New Yorkers would still be able to buy 10-round magazines under the new assault weapons ban, they will face misdemeanor charges if they carry more than seven bullets in those magazines unless they're at a gun competition or shooting range. The president of the New York Rifle & Pistol Association, who has been preparing a lawsuit to overturn the law, told the AP that Cuomo's proposed revision will not change his plans to file suit.


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    New York is one of just five states that limits magazines to 10 rounds. Colorado's Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper signed gun legislation on Wednesday that included a 15-round magazine limit, which has also prompted the threat of lawsuits and the avowed departure of the state's largest magazine producer.

    The apparent political appetite for stricter gun controls in the wake of the shocking Newtown tragedy may be starting to dull. Sen. Dianne Feinstein's (D-Calif.) federal assault weapons ban appears to be all but DOA in the Senate. However, on Wednesday Vice President Joe Biden told NPR that the Obama administration isn't giving up the fight yet.

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