Barbara Arnwine, Civil Rights Lawyer, Home Raided By Police

Discussion in 'Civil Rights & Privacy' started by Elizabeth Conley, Nov 28, 2011.

  1. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

    Passing strange:

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/11/28/barbara-arnwine-civil-rig_n_1117186.html

    I know I'm supposed to be all chatty about this stuff, but I'm still mulling it over. I guess I'm still at
    "WTF?" When I've thought about it I'll have an opinion and shoot off at the mouth.

    http://politic365.com/2011/11/28/pg-county-cops-raid-home-of-prominent-civil-rights-lawyer/
     
  2. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    This is the same two-digit-IQ Prince Georges SWAT team that raided the home of Mayor (Berwyn Heights) Cheye Calvo in 2008 & shot his dogs. They never presented a warrant.

    Prince Georges County settled the lawsuit on the day the civil trial would have started, although I don't believe the amount of the settlement was every announced:

    Apparently the retards on the Prince Georges SWAT team are more learning impaired than was previously thought.

    Who's next, and will they be alive to tell about it?
     
  3. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    Obama is said to be interested in this case, fwiw
     
  4. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    I submitted this to Drudge along w/ the Cheye Calvo links.
     
    Elizabeth Conley likes this.
  5. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Maybe they'll do a warrantless raid on the White House next, and why not? So far they've rolled a mayor & a prominent civil rights attorney.
     
  6. Cartoon Peril

    Cartoon Peril Original Member

    Either a warrant was issued or it was not. Warrants generally are not secret once they are issued. The police should know whether they have a warrant. Generally they are required by state law to leave a copy of the warrant at the premises searched. It is quite unlawful for the police to pretend to have a warrant when they do not, and thereby gain entrance to the premises.
     
    Elizabeth Conley likes this.
  7. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    This bunch of cowboys seems not to care.
     
  8. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    Then they will pay, and should pay individually as well.
     
    Elizabeth Conley likes this.
  9. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    This country is so going down the drain.

    These SWAT teams are obscene. And even if they had a warrant (and I would think, with her being a lawyer, she would've demanded to see it), these military-style raids are going on all the time. Take a look at the string of peace activists whose homes were likewise raided and trashed and who are still fighting to stay out of jail. This could happen to any of us:
    http://www.stopfbi.net/about/profiles
     
    DeafBlonde and Elizabeth Conley like this.
  10. Leave no trace

    Leave no trace Original Member

    Did the USA throw away the constitution while I wasn't looking?
     
  11. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    According to an article on the ABA web site, there was a search warrant. On page 7 there is this ....

    Note bolded portion -- according to page 8 the warrant was "(sealed per court order).

    So basically (from the citizens' perspective) this was a warrantless raid by jack-booted thugs in the middle of the night.

    The underlying warrant request seems reasonable, but is it really necessary to do this stuff in the middle of the night and keep it secret for almost two weeks? We got rid of the Gestapo in 1945. Let's keep them gone.

    There is also an arrest warrant dated 24 Nov for her Nephew, Curtis Lamar Ford.
     
  12. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    There's a lot of chatter about this on the internet but zero attention from "mainstream" media. The Huffington article is as close as it gets to mainstream. Mainstream media seems to care less about this.
     
    Lisa Simeone likes this.
  13. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    I tried to get some people from the mainstream media interested, so far to no avail. Big shock. (And these are the people lecturing me on journalistic "ethics.")
     
    Elizabeth Conley likes this.
  14. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

    I think they're crazy if they don't present the owner with a warrant and get them to sign receipt for a copy.

    CYA should be their watchword, particularly given their history.
     
    Cartoon Peril likes this.
  15. Cartoon Peril

    Cartoon Peril Original Member

    Every state law I'm aware of requires that a copy of the warrant be left at the place that is searched. Sometimes people aren't present at the search, so it's generally not the practice, as far as I'm aware, to have a receipt issued for a copy of the warrant. Sometimes there is a claim that this was not done. While it is a violation of law not to do so, it generally does not affect the constitutionality of the search. Failure to leave a copy of the warrant does not however mean that the warrant is secret. The general practice as far as I know is for the courts to maintain a public access document collection called the "search warrant file" and the warrants, as well as the supporting affidavits, can be reviewed in that.
     
  16. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    I can see why they would seal the complete warrant -- if they don't find what they're looking for, people talk and the evidence might disappear before they get another crack at it. However, that shouldn't preclude serving the owner with a short-form also signed by the same judge advising as to the premises to be searched, the expiration date of the warrant, and notice that the full text of the warrant has been sealed under court order. These people are just too damned lazy & sloppy even to pay lip service to the meaning of the 4th amendment.

    A couple other things stand out. Barbara Arnwine is convinced they didn't know who she was & who owned the house. The search warrant affidavit was fixated on the black guy they traced from the robbery & his prior arrest. I think it's a reasonable assumption that the SWAT team just set to bag some black trash & the heck with any niceties like letting them use the bathroom in the three hours that they're being held hostage -- no need to do any research on who owns the home or who else might be around.

    Admittedly I have a small sample to deal with in my knowledge of Prince Georges SWAT raids, but this indifference -- abuse of the occupants, failure to present any warrant, even shooting pets in a living room in another case -- seem to be par for the course in Prince Georges County.

    With regard to researching home ownership, there was a case in Minneapolis where they crashed into the wrong house unanncounced on a no-knock warrant and the owner did a great job of shooting back until the two-digit IQs realized they had the wrong house & the homeowner finally figured out they were cops. That turned into another nice financial settlement for the homeowner.
     
  17. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Read the text that I referenced on pages 7 & 8 -- this warrant was "sealed" and they had no intention of doing that. According to the ABA, the warrant was unsealed on the 25th.

    Personally, I feel that's unconstitutional, but there are plenty of cops & some judges who feel that constitutionality is optional.
     
  18. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    PG County is, indeed, one of the worst.
     
  19. Frank

    Frank Original Member

    Unless they get a judge to seal it. This is a standard tactic when the cops fornicate the canine, that way it can't be used in the civil lawsuit.
     

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