Boggie Dog Suspended...and Other War Crimes and Atrocities

Discussion in 'What's On Your Mind?' started by nachtnebel, Nov 11, 2011.

  1. LeeAnne

    LeeAnne Original Member

    It's on a Samsung Fascinate. I don't have the phone with me - it's at home, I'm at work. I upgraded to an iPhone recently, so the Samsung is in a drawer at home. I'll try to find it when I get home.
     
  2. TravelnMedic

    TravelnMedic Original Member

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samsung_Galaxy_S

    From what im reading the camera is recording 720p HD content at 12mbps, but not sure on the format. looks like a convertor is needed since its not a std mp4 format http://www.alloksoft.com/

    Samsung Fascinate Specs

    General
    Form Factor: Candybar
    AKA: Samsung Galaxy S
    Date Released (YYYY/MM/DD): 2010/09/08
    Size
    Weight: 4.16 oz (118 g)
    Dimensions: 4.92 x 2.53 x 0.39
    Display
    Resolution: 480x800 pixels
    Size: 4.00 inches
    Type: Super AMOLED Capacative
    Camera
    Video: 720p HD
    Flash: Yes; LED
    Auto-focus: Yes
    Megapixels: 5.0 MP
    Connectivity
    GPS: Yes; A-GPS
    USB: USB 2.0 microUSB
    Bluetooth: 3.0 with A2DP
    Wi-Fi: 802.11b/802.11g/802.11n
    HDMI: No
    Multimedia
    Headset Jack: 3.5 mm
    Radio: FM with RDS
    Battery
    Type: 1500 mAh
    Hardware/OS
    Operating System: Android 2.1 with TouchWiz
    Internal Memory: 2 gb
    External Memory: MicroSD/SDHC up to 32 gb
    RAM: 512
    Processor: 1GHz Cortex A8 Hummingbird
     
  3. CelticWhisper

    CelticWhisper Founding Member

  4. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Who knows what they're claiming. 20 minutes of her video are missing:

    If you watch the surviving video, you see that they make her wait over 40 minutes in the glass prison booth, then close the security line so no other passengers come through, then take her out and search her. What can we conclude but that they do this so no one else can witness them harassing her?
     
  5. LeeAnne

    LeeAnne Original Member

    Okay I found the phone...but unfortunately no video. :mad: It appears my entire card has been erased, and I can only assume this happened when I switched to this iPhone. I went into a Verizon store to have them transfer all of my contacts and media, and the guy started to transfer all of my pics & videos but he said there was too much and it was going to take too long. I told him to go ahead and stop the transfer and I'd figure something else out, so he stopped the transfer. Now it's all GONE.

    What's worse is, I had a video that had an EXCELLENT audio of my experience at LAX in July, when I had my vagina karate-chopped several times by a screener pissed-off that I'd opted out of the scanner. Damn - that was a great audio...way better than the OKC one, you could distinctly hear her me telling her to stop slamming her hand into my vagina, then her tell me not to use the word "vagina" because there were "kids in the line", and I said "stop touching it and I'll stop saying it!", and the supervisor threatening to "walk me out of the airport..."

    Oh well. I'm not pleased. Sorry to get you guys all excited.

    It doesn't change what happened.
     
  6. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

    Don't fret about this LeeAnne. There's plenty of evidence of TSA malfeasance out there. If evidence would sway folks the TSA would be ancient history by now.

    For your own sake, load your next TSA crime recording onto some other storage medium. Cell phones are no place to store anything vital. I think we've all lost cherished data that way:oops: I know I have;)
     
  7. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    As a representative of TSA? I can't give you an official statement, I have been posting here on my own, trying to lend a bit of information to the discussions here. On a personal level, I am sorry that you have had these experiences, and I have empathy for you, but you are asking me for a response that I just can't give you.

    You ask if a family member came to me with something like this, what would I do, I would call in every favor I have and pursue this down every legal avenue I possibly could - but you are not a family member. If you have not done so, then I do suggest that you do - the only way to prevent the folks that do wrong is to call them out and force them into accountability. From my position, I do not have that capability for you - you have to take those steps. Also, I would ask the same questions of the family member that I asked of you.

    If things happened as you say (again, I only have what you have told me), then you should pursue this as far as you can. If things happened as you say, then I wish you peace and hope that you can recover from the impact this has had on you, and I hope that by pursuing this as far as you can, that it will change something so a similar situation does not occur for someone else. I know this is not what you want to hear, but it is the best that I can give you.
     
  8. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    I am uncertain as to whether that is part of the PS process at this time. There is not a lot of info available aboout PS just yet, it is still in it's infancy.
     
  9. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Call me stupid but what does PS stand for?
     
  10. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    Professional Standards, and I will not call you stupid.
     
  11. RB

    RB Founding Member

    From the TSA Blog:

    Rugape, is it TSA policy to require the removal of medical devices so they can be screened? How does PS stack up on this point?
    
    Was Proper Procedure Followed?
     
  12. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    TSA policy has always said, explicitly, on their website, that you should not remove your brace/cast/medical appliance and that no TSA clerk will ask you to do so. But as we already know from first-person testimony, that's baloney and many people have been forced to remove their brace/cast/medical appliance. (Oh, but then I wasn't there myself, so I'm sure all those people are lying. It's the woke-up-on-the-wrong-side-of-the-bed syndrome.)

    Lemme guess -- the "Professional Standards" group will have a meeting, or two or three or four, or appoint a "task force" to figure out why so many of their employees are too stupid to follow the rules.
     
  13. RB

    RB Founding Member

    This question or versions of it has been asked repeatedly on the TSA Blog only to be met with the typical silence common to that blog. For a Blog that is to said to discuss things very little discussion happens.

    I know what the publicly available information provided by TSA says. The question goes to what are TSA screeners being told to do. If it is the same as what we have to work with then it seems clear that the screeners in this case violated TSA policy and should be disciplined. If they are being told differently then the public is being misinformed, possibly intentionally.

    So since we have the benefit of a TSA employee contributor who is honest and of high integrity I asked a simple question that surely doesn't get into the SSI issue. All that is really needed is to confirm that the information we have is correct or not correct.
     
  14. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    The policy I have always had is the exact same one that is posted on the website, we are not to require someone to remove a medical device. The option is there for someone that does not wish to undergo additional screening, but that is a choice of the individual to make, not something we require.

    PS is still in it's infancy, and I have very little information on their processes or procedures. As soon as more information is made public, I will give you some links to the info. I hope that they are used properly to help remove "bad" employees from the workforce for cause. LLike you, I am waiting to see what comes up in the future.

    The last information on proper procedure I have is the same as yours, what was printed on the TSA blog.
     
  15. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    bolding mine.

    This is the heart of the matter, isn't it? additional screening. Seems so innocuous, so reasonable unless you realize it could mean anything, including removal of clothing to expose it, to permit swabbing of it. Or, in the experience of some, it has meant a thorough crotch and breast feel over. And this is the problem. If you don't come up with a method and/or supporting rationale for valid ways handle this case, you guarantee that these invasive methods will be used. Being injured or being old should not be penalized by sexual molestation or the humiliation of being stripped.

    Some passengers report that they were asked to swab their own medical equipment under their clothes. Such methods are eminently reasonable, IMO. Having a stranger reaching under your clothes is not.
     
  16. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I appreciate the straight answer.

    I have a question about what it is you stated. "The option is there for someone that does not wish to undergo additional screening" phrase is what concerns me. TSA reported on their blog that the medical appliance was removed and screened at JFK. So did TSA require this action? Certainly seems like that was the case and which resulted in the complaint of a forced Strip Search.

    It certainly seems that TSA employees should have known the item didn't require removal yet participated to some degree in doing just that. I know you're not going to say how the item should be cleared but it does seem there are methods which do not require removal of medical appliances. I can only conclude that the TSA employees involved may well be implicated in improper screening methods and I think should be removed from all TSA screening functions until all investigations are concluded.
    
    
     
  17. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    I have never required someone to remove a medical instrument, but I have had many folks that have removed them of their own volition, not at my prodding. I can't speak for other people or circumstances, and I realize that things are not always done as they are supposed to. Sometimes I have had passengers ask if they can remove a medical device and almost uniformly the answer from me has been only if the doctor says it is ok and you can do so without hurting yourself, but we can screen the item in place, we do it all the time. We can screen around every medical implement I have ever encountered without removing them, and if I have never seen it before, I certainly wouldn't ask the passenger to remove it. There are protocols in place to allow these folks to keep their medical implements on, and there is no reason I have heard (short of finding some sort of illegal/dangerous item on/in them - and even then, we do not require them to remove the item, we contact LEO and let them take over) that would compel me to change that process.
     
  18. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I'm not asking about what you have done but I am asking about the reported incident as posted by TSA on the TSA Blog. It clearly says the item was removed then screened. I find that incident troubling as it appears that the TSA screeners participated in some degree in having the item removed, so much so that the individual reported the incident as a Strip Search.
     
    Lisa Simeone likes this.
  19. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    I have no further info on the incident as posted on the blog. I can tell you that they are still looking into it, and I hope to have more info on that one, but I am not in the loop for new info at this moment. If they have more info and post, maybe there was something going on that we do not know about - I simply do not know what happened.
     
  20. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I appreciate that you don't have any inside information but it does seems that the incident as related on the TSA Blog implicates the TSA screeners actions as being not in compliance with TSA policy.

    If nothing happened why would there be need of an ongoing investigation over a week after the incident.

    I honestly believe that the many problems we hear about concerning TSA are the result of lack of effective leadership. Those in TSA policy making positions have convinced themselves that TSA is doing everything right while all evidence points to exactly the opposite.

    How many failures have to happen before TSA wakes up to the idea that something at TSA is very wrong?
     

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