FAA Orders Review Of Boeing 787 Dreamliner

Discussion in 'What's On Your Mind?' started by RB, Jan 11, 2013.

  1. RB

    RB Founding Member

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way...-faa-to-order-review-of-boeing-787-dreamliner

    I'm not fully up to speed on all of the issues with the Dreamliner but seems every week or so some new story pops up. The fuel leak that happened at Boston was so bad that a tower operator called the airplane and reported the problem. I recognize rolling out new technology can be difficult but seems this airplane is jinxed.
     
  2. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    Someone didn't cap the fuel in Boston. Nonetheless, lots of events. On the electrical:

    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/01/12/b...-review-of-boeing-787s.html?pagewanted=1&_r=0 This story doesn't mention three days of Boeing trying to keep FAA from issuing the Review.
     
  3. RB

    RB Founding Member

    The fuel leak issue was valves open between two tanks that allowed fuel to move to a surge tank and then vent to ground. I would need to see how the system is plumbed but that is something much more than not capping the fuel. All aircraft fuel tanks are vented to atmosphere. Otherwise as fuel is burned out of a tank there would not be anything to break the vacuum and the tank would collapse. These vents should only let air in and not let fuel out. That sounds to me to be part of what happen with the dreamliner. The there was a electrical fire in the Auxiliary Power Unit compartment on another aircraft this week. 787 problems just don't seem to let up. They call it the "Dreamliner" the Bad Dream liner it seems.
     
    KrazyKat likes this.
  4. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    Excuse my rank ignorance of fuel/valve systems, RB. Right you are that problems just keep coming, another 1/13/13.
    I bet!
     
  5. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    I really have to empathize with Boeing, however. This has been radical project no only in the plane itself but also in introducing modern manufacturing methods into the process.

    The Airbus counterpart (A-350) has yet to get off the ground, although it appears finally to be getting close and might well kick the 787's butt if things work out in the efficiency department. :D
     
  6. RB

    RB Founding Member

    The 787 has replaced convential hydraulics with fly by wire and electrics in other areas to lighten the aircraft but fuel systems are old hat. I saw another story today that the same plane at Boston has had other fuel system (leaks) problems.

    http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/storie...ME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2013-01-13-09-59-44

    I hope Boing can work out the issues and I would suggest that some of these kinds of problems seem to be inherent in new aircraft designs but at some point saying "oh, its just a new aircraft design" is like calling TSA a security agency.
     
  7. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

  8. RB

    RB Founding Member

    How many incidents before customers cancel orders for the troubled Dreamliner?
     
  9. RB

    RB Founding Member

  10. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    I'm sure they'll work it out. I'm also sure that Airbus (similar A-350 under development) is quietly watching and taking notes.

    The B-787 & A-350 are planes that will make international LCC's feasible on a large scale and ultimately will turn the industry upside down.

    JetStar (Qantas' LCC subsidiary) is schedule to take delivery of its first 787's at the end of this year. Initially they'll be used for tourist runs to India & Southeast Asia, but they are capable of reaching the U.S. non-stop.
     
  11. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Perhaps but right now the Dreamliner is poised to be Boings example of the MD DC-10. If FAA takes the final step to ground all 787's that action could tarnish the airplane forever.
     
  12. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    The Martin 202 is the one you don't want to emulate. :D
     
  13. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Nor the DeHavilland Comet.

    [​IMG]
     
  14. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach


    Classic case of not testing something as it's actually going to be used. They did all their early testing (even extended trips) with the crews wearing oxygen masks and the cabin pressure greatly reduced. When they started carrying passengers, they cranked up the pressure and eventually realized that square windows cause metal fatigue.
     
  15. RB

    RB Founding Member

    FAA has grounded the Deamliner until proven safe to fly.
     
  16. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    FAA had Boeing self-certify the batteries. How did that work out?
    The batteries were being run over voltage capacity as it turned out.
    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-202_162-57564718/japan-excess-voltage-in-boeing-787-battery/ A third of the 787s are made in Japan, including the batteries. Boeing doesn't need to worry about Airbus for japanese airlines. But japan-bound passengers might feel differently.
     
  17. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Actually FAA authorized Boing to self-certify the entire aircraft.

    http://seattletimes.com/html/boeingaerospace/2009700988_webboeingfaa20.html

     
  18. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    Yikes!
    We'll hear how the batteries are an isolated (design) incident.:rolleyes:
     
  19. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Maybe there is a reason that FAA lost its airport security function.
     
    KrazyKat likes this.
  20. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    >3 NTSB, the real CSI.
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424127887324624404578253010041254492.html
     

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