Flagged by DHS @ OLCI?

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by FriendlySkies, Sep 2, 2011.

  1. FriendlySkies

    FriendlySkies Member

    Checked in for my trip to SFO last night, and this morning I discovered that my upgrade cleared. However, I now see this message:

    Could this mean that I've been flagged by DHS? I've got such an uncommon name, unless certain politicians from Alaska are on that list, so it seems unlikely. OLCI worked fine last night, so I'm a bit confused/worried..
     
  2. DeafBlonde

    DeafBlonde Original Member

    <*in a hushed voice*> If I were you, I would expect to be taken to a private room. ;)
     
  3. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    Hopefully it's mass inconveniencing, with FEAR WEEK coming up and all.
    If it has anything to do with this site, then we need to not be picked-off individually and silently.
     
  4. barbell

    barbell Coach Coach

    I wonder if this is one of the problems with inSecureFlight. In that the upgrade cleared after you checked in. Have you had that situation before in the last year?

    I'll explain from an airline systems perspective. Though related, the reservations and check-in systems used by the same airline are totally different systems running on the same platform. They do communicate with each other seamlessly and simultaneously, much like a right brain/left brain sort of logic. However, the more complexity, as with any system, things start to break down in exponential numbers. Remember, these are all 1960's technologies that have been added to, band aided, and scotch taped together with every new bell and whistle added to the mix. inSecure Flight is just the next hiccup.

    I imagine this is the process of events:

    1. Ticket issued
    2. Check in processed
    3. Upgrade cleared
    4. Ticket now "out of sync" because fare class checked in and fare class now on ticket don't match. It'd be just like if you checked in, then changed your routing, which you aren't allowed to initiate, so the airline might do that in certain cases (IROPS) and the ticket is automatically updated. I imagine that day of upgrades are so rare at your airline (and auto ones are a relatively new thing there IIRC), that no one in IT thought to create an algorithm to auto sync the ticket and no one in marketing thought to tell them to do it.
    5. Making a single "Due to security measures" error message and coding it is far easier than making specific ones for each instance. In any event you have to see an agent, so that is probably laziness.
    Then if you are flying one metal and it was booked in a different system that then had a "code share" flight number on it, well you were screwed from the beginning.

    Based on my knowledge I would say you aren't flagged, that this is rather an internal technology issue.
     
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  5. barbell

    barbell Coach Coach

    Well, they missed me yesterday, though the "amped up" factor was well in effect!
     
  6. FriendlySkies

    FriendlySkies Member

    Thanks, barbell. I've got my fingers crossed that this is just .bomb acting up, but it seems strange. I've had a few other flights that the upgrade has cleared after I've checked in, and this message has not been present. I guess we'll see what happens when I get to the airport this afternoon.
     
  7. barbell

    barbell Coach Coach


    It could just be the timing of this particular ticket. And again, if a travel agency made the reservation, if a CO codeshare flight number on a UA metal, or vice versa, any of those could wreak havoc on that ticket. Those things may be present in the ticket and you may not even be aware.

    One thing you could try is to call your help desk and ask that they "un check" you in, and confirm that the ticket is "in sync" (though they may use different language over there. I'm uncertain if that is an industry standard jargon. It's what our screens showed, so that's what we said.) At my airline only the internet help desk had the "authorization" to uncheck a ticket. Since I've left regular res now has that function, so you may need to play agent roulette until you get someone who knows how to do it.

    Then you could attempt your check-in again.
     
  8. FriendlySkies

    FriendlySkies Member

    Just checked in without issues. I've got another res on Monday, so we'll see what happens.

    Currently sitting at the gate at MCI, listening to the the TSA barkers :rolleyes:
     
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  9. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    1950's
     
  10. barbell

    barbell Coach Coach

    Well, depends on the airline, but yes, they are progeny from the 1950's...
     
  11. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Only Delta.

    The other systems updated to the SABRE/ACP/TCP. Delta was the 2nd such system developed (from AA but ran on the IBM 7074) and missed out on the updates and standardization shared by the others.

    Deltamatic eventually was ported to the System 360 in the early 70s but not updated to use stardard control & transaction systems. It's a major factor in why Delta's reservation system is such a disaster today -- you can only do so much with a modern web site and a total clunker on the back end.
     
  12. barbell

    barbell Coach Coach

    True.

    They all essentially have that problem, though.

    America West attempted to move to an entire web/cloud system, and it was going to be a huge headache. However, it was deemed "worth it" because it would have been more cost effective, more efficient, and easier to use in the long term. The merger with US put it on hold.

    Then when HP and US merged their systems, it was an unmitigated disaster on the frontend, backend, and everywhere in between. This even though both SHARES (HP) and Sabre (US) are owned by the same company and have similar interfaces, AND it was an upgrade to a more recent, more robust version of SHARES, similar to what CO uses. Every single system in the airline had problems for weeks. I'm surprised that DL didn't have the same issues when they merged PARS with Deltamatic, though as long-term codeshare partners they were more used to each others quirks. I know that customer issues exist to this day, but it was nowhere near what the customers of US had to endure.
     
  13. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Delta's operations rely on a modern (now ~ 10 years old) system known as the "Delta Nervous System". Reservations data (Deltamatic) is swept into it. This has been kept running all along and NWA operations were migrated to it, so they haven't suffered the meltdown that US experienced.
     
  14. barbell

    barbell Coach Coach

    True.

    Though, the legacy NW systems that are still being used on the backend are completely incompatible with the legacy DL systems. It's a real headache for the people who use them. There are a lot of behind-the-scenes bandaids that are problematic.
     

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