Flier, displaced by obese seatmate, forced to stand

Discussion in 'Travel' started by Sunny Goth, Nov 23, 2011.

  1. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    What??? :confused:

    Flier, displaced by obese seatmate, forced to stand

    The person next to him was so big the arm rests couldn't go down, and half of his seat was taken over by the large person. He couldn't even fasten his seatbelt.

    Here are the best quotes --

    Liz Landau, a spokesperson for US Airways, confirmed that Berkowitz was inconvenienced by a passenger of size and told msnbc.com “it was his choice to stand.”

    “His seatmate had the same right to his seat as Mr. Berkowitz did to his. So here’s where the diplomacy and cooperation of all passengers comes into play,” the airline said in a statement.

    It was his choice to stand? Not really a choice if someone else is in your seat!! And yes, his seatmate had the right to his seat, but not the seat next to him!
     
  2. DeafBlonde

    DeafBlonde Original Member

    Un-(expletive deleted)-believable!! :rolleyes: Trust me, if I were in the same situation, "Fatty" would be standing and not me!! People who take up more than one seat need to purchase more than one seat, IMHO.
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    He should file a complaint with the FAA. It's a major violation of FARs for which there would probably be a hefty fine.
     
  4. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    Absolutely. That's what I was thinking too, Mike.
     
  5. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

  6. FaustsAccountant

    FaustsAccountant Original Member

    I thought he did but the FAA referred back to AA whom stated the case was closed....
    I read the incident from a different source, will have to dig it up again.
     
  7. RB

    RB Founding Member

    From one report that I read it stated that the FA refused to let the displaced passenger sit in a jump seat because that was against airline policy. I have to wonder just what that airlines policy is if an obese person can't fit in one seat. If a jump seat was available and the FA did not let the guy sit FA should be fired along with the senior FA on the flight.

    What ever happened to common sense?
     
  8. FaustsAccountant

    FaustsAccountant Original Member

    "(Company) Policy" trumps common sense and most everything else because once an employee parrots the approved mumbo jumbo, they are protected. No matter how silly the policy sounds. Look at TSA, American Airlines and all those guys with their copy+paste statements. It's a paper shield.
     
  9. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    This gets murky. Usage of jump seats is often restricted by union contracts & work rules as well as company policies. As far as the FAA is concerned, any employee or non-rev can sit in them.

    They are not supposed to push back from the gate unless all passengers are properly seated, and they do their head count & visual safety check (belts fastened, carryons secured) first. They never should have left the gate without resolving the issue.

    With a bit of work they probably could have resolved the issue -- move qualified non-flying pilot to cockpit jump seat, find someone qualified to sit in spare FA jump seat if they plane has a spare, bump a non-rev . . . but sometimes the plane is just full & somebody's gotta go.
     
  10. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    The FA has his head up his rear and in the long run will end up in even hotter water w/ the FAA as as well as the airline for ever leaving the gate this way in the first place.
     
  11. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I understand that rules are rules, however doesn't safety trump rules in such a situation as this?

    If the Captain was made aware of the problem he should have diverted to the nearest safe landing facility. If any seat of any kind was available then the displaced passenger should have been required to use it.

    The airline and in turn this crew should face sanctions for allowing the late arriving passenger on board and not ensuring the person could be accommodated.

    The airline and crew should face sanctions for not taking any and all possible corrective action once the issue was made known to them.

    In my opinion the FA in charge should be fired and possibly the captain if s/he was made aware of the issue and still left the ground.
     
  12. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Maybe they were prototyping Ryan Air's rumored SRO aircraft? :D
     
  13. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    That, too -- turbelence has been known to result in a few broken necks and worse.

    But keep in mind that this is US Airways we're talking about: If you're brown, they'll hold up the flight 4 hours for your harassment, but if you're white, it's ok to bounce you off the cabin ceiling. At least it seems they have a way to abuse everyone.
     
    Lisa Simeone likes this.
  14. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I spent the best part of a 23 year Navy career as a flight engineer. Spent a great deal of time in the northern latitudes and have been in some hairy weather. Had one of my crew badly injure both knees. He was up loading some sonobuoys when we hit a severe down draft. When the aircraft hit bottom of the down draft his body continued sinking and his legs couldn't take the sudden g. For us that was just a risk of doing what we did but for a commercial airline this kind of thing is unacceptable and should be met with very stiff regulatory penalties.

    If I had any say in this US Airways would be sanctioned big time.
     
    Lisa Simeone likes this.

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