Forced Military Testing in America's Schools

Discussion in 'Civil Rights & Privacy' started by Lisa Simeone, Jan 8, 2012.

  1. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Forced Military Testing in America's Schools
    Gee, regulations solely for public consumption, that it has no intention of following? Where have I heard that before?
     
  2. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

    I strongly object to any mandatory school activities that don't directly involve instruction in Language Arts, Mathematics, Science, Geography, History, Foreign Language and U.S. Government. (Yes, I think Art, Music and PE are important, but nonetheless electives.)
     
  3. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Well, just think -- there's probably all kinds of bad grammar and syntax in the ASVAB. That relates to Language Arts!
     
  4. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    Hmm, I'm not an expert on the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) but I'll ask around. Maybe the military gets around this via the 'No Child Left Behind Act'? Not that that makes it okay.....
     
  5. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    Off topic, but -- with obesity rates rising the way they are, I'd argue that PE should be mandatory for health reasons and that kids should have to do PE everyday.
     
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  6. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    I agree for the need for physical training. But in an example of a good end with really awful means, take a look at this story about students in St. Louis being sent home with bracelets to record physical activity (http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/201...ts-to-monitor-children-at-school-and-at-home/). This is Orwellian to the max. . Handheld device makers (iphone, androids) can determine from the motions what is being done with the device, cf also how the Wii works. Depending on the device sensitivity and design, such biometric data could be used to construct in great detail EXACTLY what you do all day and when. If the age of the person fit into the range of sexual activity, these devices could yield information about that as well...It is simply a matter of making a dictionary of motions and mapping the data to those.

    This invasion of privacy is beyond nuts.
     
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  7. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    I agree ... In college, too. PT every morning at 0600 in the dorms no matter what condition you're in from the night before. My "physical" education courses (badminton & archery, marskmanship) didn't do much for me in later life. High school could be less rigorous, they would have had to wait at least until 0830 when we showed up.
     
  8. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    Riiiiiiiight.

    I'm still not sure how I made it to school on time - I've never been a morning person. And those 8am classes in college? Most people didn't even know I was in their class until they saw me for the midterm and final, that's how often I showed up for those.
     
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  9. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    :eek::eek::eek: Yikes!!! That's horrible!!

    Nothing like getting kids to accept surveillance at a young age.
     
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  10. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    My 8 a.m. freshman course (1971-72) was comparative government. The prof (Bernard Borning) would bring in a huge coffee pot (40-50 cups) on Monday mornings, set it up in the corner of the classroom, and put a "Black Power" sign on it. :D

    He understood. :)
     
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  11. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    HA! None of my professors were that thoughtful.
     
  12. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I attended part of my high school years in California, the rest in Texas. In California everyone had PE class. We had all manner of field activties. My school had both a lap and diving pool. We had weight rooms, tennis courts, hand ball courts, baseball and football fields, just about any indoor or outdoor activity possible. In Texas all one need do to not have PE was to be in a sport, band, or other such activity.
     
  13. barbell

    barbell Coach Coach

    There's a reason I majored in English.

    Not a single class before 10am. Not.a.one. for 4 years.
     
  14. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    That might be why I finished in Classics -- no undergraduate classes ever before 11 a.m. Most were mid/late afternoon. That changed in graduate school, however. Graduate level Latin composition at 9 a.m. can add a new dimension to a hangover.
     
  15. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

    I disagree. Schools are for education, not various feel-good agendas. If education is delivered efficiently then kids have more time left over for everthing else, physical activity included. Let one feel-good agenda in the schools, and they all get a foot wedged in the door. Until scores are off the charts the answer to every feel-good agenda should be "Heck No!"
     
  16. Doober

    Doober Original Member

    http://www.ehow.com/info_7917660_federal-military-service-public-schools.html

    There was a big brouhaha in NY states schools in the last couple of years regarding military recruitment on campus. I thought the end result was that parents had to opt-in to allow their child to be contacted by a recruiter. The article below indicates that the school is question has the opt-in policy.

    http://www.redorbit.com/news/education/272602/junior_rotc_in_high_school_protested/

     
  17. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    I would never have thought to put the words 'kids' and 'efficiently' together in the same sentence. ;) But seriously, I'm not sure that education can be delivered efficiently, especially when you have kids with varying degrees of ability all in one class.

    Schools are for education although I guess 'education' like anything, can be defined narrowly or broadly.... I'm not sure what a 'feel-good agenda' is though (I'm not being snarky, I just haven't heard the term).....

    When I was in high school I hated PE, but looking back on it, I was glad I had to do it. I definitely learned about teamwork and good sportsmanship, which are applicable throughout life. I also learned that I'm not good at hitting tiny little balls with bats, racquets, or clubs.

    I agree that things like band, drama classes, art, etc, are 'electives', but these classes often open doors to future careers in those areas. For myself, I've never regretted being in band all through grade school and high school. Again, it's teamwork, pulling together for a goal (the performance), discipline (gotta practice!), socialization, etc..

    I don't think this is going to happen until we get class sizes down (among other things).

    Note: Almost all of my relatives are teachers (kindergarten through high school, including two in special ed), so I'm definitely biased.
     
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  18. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    Wow, cool. I thought most schools were opt-out. Glad to see some opt-in.
     
  19. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    PE is hardly a "feel good" agenda. It's been part of American education for as long as I can remember.
     
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  20. N965VJ

    N965VJ Original Member

    I guess the ASVAB wasn't around when I was in high school in the 80's because I've never heard of it. I wonder how many kids munge the tests with bad answers, SSN off by a digit, etc.

    They mixed the guys and girls together in my school, with predictable results when we did things like floor hockey. Girls would see me coming and just drop their stick and run away. But all that manly aggression was wiped out when we did aerobic dancing. Put the Pointer Sisters cassette in the boom box:

    I'm so excited and I just can't hide it
    I'm about to lose control and I think I like it ♪ ♫
    :eek::D

    I used to make Bust (expletive deleted) Coffee® on the airplane. Here's the recipe.
     

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