GAO: TSA's Passenger Screening Canine Misses Explosive Training Device Inside an Airport Terminal

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Fisher1949, Jan 31, 2013.

  1. Fisher1949

    Fisher1949 Original Member Coach

    Somehow even the TSA dogs can't do their jobs. Must be the working environment.


    This video shows a decoy carrying an explosive training aid. As the decoy approaches TSA's Passenger Screening Canine Team, the canine misses the explosive training aid and instead follows another passenger. The Passenger Screening Canine Team provides a response to the passenger it initially followed. A trainer, observing the training exercise, determines that the canine provided a non-productive response, that is, provided a final response even though explosive odor was not present. Produced in cooperation with TSA/DHS.
    Learn more: http://www.gao.gov/products/GAO-13-239
    Get Transcript: http://www.gao.gov/assets/660/651694.txt
     
  2. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Like everything else associated with TSA, even the canine program has gone to the dogs.
     
    RB likes this.
  3. FliesWay2Much

    FliesWay2Much Original Member

    It must be really tough on the dogs trying to find bombs and drugs at the same time...
     
  4. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Name one thing TSA has rolled out that has been successful.
     
  5. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    They were originally successful in getting a majority of Americans to believe that a bunch of slack-jawed knuckle-dragging GED-bearing lackwits unqualified for any sort of public-facing work were capable of making everyone "safer." Since then? Not so much.
     
  6. RB

    RB Founding Member

    So TSA even screwed up an originally successful program and it ended up in the failed category too.
     
  7. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    International Business Times: Why TSA’s Canine Unit Is In The Doghouse

    Transportation Security Administration officers are used to criticism by now, but a new report released on Thursday by the Government Accountability Office takes aim at the officers’ secret weapon: the agency's dogs.

    The TSA uses “threat detection dogs” in the National Canine Program to search for explosives at airports, but after following several teams over the past year, the GAO believes the TSA may be wasting millions of dollars in taxpayer money on dogs that can’t actually detect specific threats.

    Over the past three years, the cost of keeping the German Shepherds, Belgian Malinoises, Hungarian Vizslas and other breeds with keen noses on the government’s payroll has nearly doubled from $52 million to more than $100 million.
     
  8. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Government Accounting Office: Actions Needed to Analyze Data and Ensure Canine Teams Are Effectively Utilized, GAO-13-239, Jan 31, 2013 [PDF Warning: 1.75MB]

    Highlights

    What GAO Found

    The Transportation Security Administration (TSA), the federal agency that administers the National Canine Program (NCP), is collecting and using key data on its canine program, but could better analyze these data to identify program trends. TSA collects canine team data using the Canine Website System (CWS), a central management database. TSA uses CWS to capture the amount of time canine teams conduct training as well as searching for explosives odor, among other functions. However, TSA has not fully analyzed the data it collects in CWS to identify program trends and areas that are working well or in need of corrective action. Such analyses could help TSA to determine canine teams' proficiency, inform future deployment efforts, and help ensure that taxpayer funds are used effectively. For example:
    • GAO analysis of canine team training data from May 2011 through April 2012 showed that some canine teams were repeatedly not in compliance with TSA's monthly training requirement, which is in place to ensure canine teams remain proficient in explosives detection.
    • GAO analysis of TSA's cargo-screening data from September 2011 through July 2012 showed that canine teams primarily responsible for screening air cargo placed on passenger aircraft exceeded their monthly screening requirement. This suggests that TSA could increase the percentage of air cargo it requires air cargo canine teams to screen or redeploy teams.
    TSA has not deployed passenger screening canines (PSC)--trained to identify and track explosives odor on a person--consistent with its risk-based approach, and did not determine PSC teams' effectiveness prior to deployment. TSA's 2012 Strategic Framework calls for the deployment of PSC teams based on risk; however, GAO found that PSC teams have not been deployed to the highest-risk airport locations. TSA officials stated that the agency generally defers to airport officials on whether PSC teams will be deployed, and some airport operators have decided against the use of PSC teams at their airports because of concerns related to the composition and capabilities of PSC teams. As a result of these concerns, the PSC teams deployed to higher-risk airport locations are not being used for passenger screening as intended, but for other purposes, such as screening air cargo or training. TSA is coordinating with aviation stakeholders to resolve concerns related to PSC team deployment, but has been unable to resolve these concerns, as of September 2012. Furthermore, TSA began deploying PSC teams in April 2011 prior to determining the teams' operational effectiveness and before identifying where within the airport these teams would be most effectively utilized. TSA is in the process of assessing the effectiveness of PSC teams in the operational environment, but testing is not comprehensive since it does not include all areas at the airport or compare PSCs with already deployed conventional canines (trained to detect explosives in stationary objects). As a result, more comprehensive testing could provide TSA with greater assurance that PSC teams are effective in identifying explosives odor on passengers and provide an enhanced security benefit.
    This is a public version of a sensitive report that GAO issued in December 2012. Information TSA deemed Sensitive Security Information has been redacted.
    Why GAO Did This Study

    TSA has implemented a multilayered system composed of people, processes, and technology to protect the transportation system. One of TSA's security layers is NCP, composed of over 760 deployed explosives detection canine teams, including PSC teams trained to detect explosives on passengers. As requested, GAO examined (1) data TSA has on its canine program, what these data show, and to what extent TSA analyzed these data to identify program trends, and (2) the extent to which TSA deployed PSC teams using a risk-based approach and determined their effectiveness prior to deployment. To address these questions, GAO conducted visits to four geographic locations selected based on the number and type of canine teams deployed. The results of these site visits are not generalizable, but provided insights into NCP. GAO also analyzed TSA data from 2011 through 2012, such as utilization data; reviewed documents, including response protocols; and interviewed DHS officials.
    What GAO Recommends

    GAO is recommending that TSA (1) regularly analyze data to identify program trends and areas working well or in need of corrective action, and (2) take actions to comprehensively assess the effectiveness of PSCs. If PSCs are determined to be effective, GAO is recommending that TSA coordinate with stakeholders to deploy PSC teams to the highest-risk airport locations and utilize them as intended. DHS concurred with GAO's recommendations.
    For more information, contact Stephen Lord at (202) 512-4379 or lords@gao.gov.

    Recommendations for Executive Action

    Recommendation: To help ensure TSA analyzes canine team data to identify program trends, and determines if PSC teams provide an added security benefit to the civil aviation system, and if so, deploys PSC teams to the highest-risk airports, the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration should direct the Manager of the NCP to regularly analyze available data to identify program trends and areas that are working well and those in need of corrective action to guide program resources and activities. These analyses could include, but not be limited to, analyzing and documenting trends in proficiency training, canine utilization, results of short notice assessments Explosive De(covert tests) and final canine responses, performance differences between LEO and TSI canine teams, as well as an assessment of the optimum location and number of canine teams that should be deployed to secure the U.S. transportation system.

    Agency Affected: Department of Homeland Security: Transportation Security Administration

    Status: Review Pending

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

    Recommendation: To help ensure TSA analyzes canine team data to identify program trends, and determines if PSC teams provide an added security benefit to the civil aviation system, and if so, deploys PSC teams to the highest-risk airports, the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration should direct the Manager of the NCP to expand and complete testing, in conjunction with DHS S&T, to assess the effectiveness of PSCs and conventional canines in all airport areas deemed appropriate (i.e., in the sterile area, at the passenger checkpoint, and on the public side of the airport) prior to making additional PSC deployments to help (1) determine whether PSCs are effective at screening passengers, and resource expenditures for PSC training are warranted, and (2) inform decisions regarding the type of canine team to deploy and where to optimally deploy such teams within airports.

    Agency Affected: Department of Homeland Security: Transportation Security Administration

    Status: Review Pending

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.

    Recommendation: To help ensure TSA analyzes canine team data to identify program trends, and determines if PSC teams provide an added security benefit to the civil aviation system, and if so, deploys PSC teams to the highest-risk airports, the Administrator of the Transportation Security Administration should, if PSCs are determined to provide an enhanced security benefit, coordinate with airport stakeholders to deploy future PSC teams to the highest-risk airports, and ensure that deployed PSC teams are utilized as intended, consistent with its statutory authority to provide for the screening of passengers and their property.

    Agency Affected: Department of Homeland Security: Transportation Security Administration

    Status: Review Pending

    Comments: When we confirm what actions the agency has taken in response to this recommendation, we will provide updated information.
     
  9. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Original title was "Secret Video Shows Bomb Dogs Failing Tests" ...

    "have not been adequately tested": How many times have we already heard this refrain with regard toTSA? Yet they continue to waste our money on one bogus program after another.

    ABC News: Report Casts Doubt on Effectiveness of Bomb-Sniffing Dogs

    A new government investigation suggests that the Transportation Security Administration is not collecting enough detailed information to know if its bomb dogs are well trained and capable of finding bombs at the nation's airports, and includes secret video that shows the dogs failing tests to detect explosives. TSA has been testing bomb dogs in Miami and Oklahoma City and will be testing them at Dulles airport, outside Washington, D.C., this month. A GAO report released this week, however, says that the passenger-screening canines have not been adequately tested, and included secret video shot over the past year that showed the dogs failing to detect explosives properly at the test airports ...
     
  10. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    dare we say it: TSA screwed the pooch again.
     

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