Government Security News: Bazooka round causes DFW evacuation

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Mike, Jun 25, 2012.

  1. barbell

    barbell Coach Coach

    Oh, and one other reason wait times are down?

    So are enplanements, also thanks to TSA.
     
  2. RB

    RB Founding Member

    The entire SOP was disclosed. Did anyone at DHS or TSA get fired or go to jail?
     
    nachtnebel likes this.
  3. I notice you also haven't commented on the threads written by a woman in a wheelchair who says she was penetrated, anally and vaginally, that she was interrogated, and that her wheelchair was broken in the process.

    SSI?
     
  4. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    "...qualified only for 'employment' with the TSA."
     
  5. DeafBlonde

    DeafBlonde Original Member

    I work as a document analyst in civil litigation, and I have never heard of SSI as security classification pertaining to any document, whether it be a corporate, government, or legal document.
     
  6. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    I had a Secret clearance all the way through my military service, and prior to working in the aviation industry, I had never heard of SSI. However, it has been in existence since 1976 and has been used by the FAA prior to (as well as since) the introduction of DHS/TSA.
     
  7. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    According to what I have read, it was an out of date one (which is true), and it was a mistake, not a willful disclosure - there is a quantifiable difference between posting something incorrectly as a part of a solicitation for contracts and willfully disclosing parts of SSI in a public forum.
     
  8. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    Nope, in that case, I have one person stating their experience from their own point of view. I am unable to comment on the situation because I have no other information to go on - no video, no witnesses, just a posting from someone online. So, instead of commenting on something I have very little information on, I simply do not comment.
     
  9. RB

    RB Founding Member

    The SOP was provided to potential contractors so they could formulate bids so I doubt it was out of date. How could TSA expect a valid bid if the SOP showing what the job entailed was not current, or perhaps TSA was trying to sabatoge the contractors. The later sounds more TSA to me so you may be correct.

    In the matter of law does doing something illegal pend on it being an accident or on purpose? If I get caught doing 80 mph in a 60 zone I should just say it's a mistake and nothing will happen? Don't fricken think so.
     
  10. Doober

    Doober Original Member

    You don't have to have personal knowledge of the incident in order to make a comment. You could say:

    "If this happened as you state, the SOP was not followed."

    It's very convenient to say "I have no personal knowledge of this so I can't comment." It's the weasel's way out.
     
    Elizabeth Conley likes this.
  11. Doober

    Doober Original Member

    And TSA is still hiring more screeners so that we can have many more Thousands Standing Around.

    http://www.kptv.com/story/18574738/tsa-hiring-part-time-security-screeners
     
    Elizabeth Conley likes this.
  12. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    Contract bids are done based on approximation of process all the time, giving a basic outline of the expectations without giving detailed info. The one disclosed online, was out of date and disclosed (apparently) by accident.

    There are tons of cases where the intent or accidental vs willing distribution make a huge difference.

    That is an apples/oranges comparison with speeding, you are willfully doing the act to begin with, you can claim accidently running the speed you are caught at, but it is highly unlikely they will accept it or cut you some slack on it. With disclosing information, there is the case where someone discloses info by accident (such as the SOP disclosure, it was not supposed to be accessible online based on what I have read), whereas if I were to willingly and knowingly disclose SSI, it would be completely different.
     
  13. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    If things happened as she indicates, then the SOP was most assuredly not followed. Which I have stated in threads before, which is usually followed by a few comments of either personal attacks or decrying my statement as the cowards way out because I did not immediately take the OPs side. Devils way if I do, Devils way if I don't, so I choose to not comment in general on threads like the one you have mentioned.
     
  14. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    This is unfortunately what happens when you choose the devil's side.
     
    Elizabeth Conley likes this.
  15. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    And confirmation provided.
     
  16. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    I don't think it's right to hold Rugapes' feet to the fire for some other person's malfeasance, nor for the shortcomings in TSA's hiring standards.

    My issue with him, as with any TSA clerk, is the willingness to continue working for an outfit that has in their procedures and practices, such egregious violations of the US Constitution and basic human decency as
    1. The repeated touching of someone's sexual organs, buttocks, hair, feeling inside someone's clothing NOT on the basis of even reasonable cause, but at random for no cause.
    2. The same awful behavior for insufficient cause (ie, mmw scanners that alert falsely on a very high percentage of cases, unlike the WTMD that rarely generated false alarms).
    3. The same awful behavior for those refusing unsafe X-ray machines that still, to this day, render one's near naked body visible to a pervert viewer in a booth.
    4. And even worse behavior, the open palm and fingers massaging your groin and sex organs if you alarmed an ETD swab test that has false alarmed 100% of the time.

    Coupled with this is the complete vulnerability of the passenger and complete inability to defend oneself or seek redress if the clerk abuses them in the high crotch touching or in the private room where they get their balls racked.

    For those things, continuing employment after knowledge, is absolutely no different than continuing to be a guard in a death camp when you have the choice to leave. You are providing positive support for something that should not be, something that is inherently wicked.
     
  17. jtodd

    jtodd Original Member

    It is for these, and other, reasons that I don't and will not converse with TSA employees. Their wanton disregard of the constitition, laws and basic decency makes any discussion with them regarding acceptable and practical security moot. They believe that strip searching and stealing of peoples property under threats and bullying is absolutely necessary, since that is what they continue to do. Convincing them that anything less is needed and, in fact, required, is like telling the devil that the heat can be turned down.

    Screw the (expletive deleted)!
     
  18. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Some of them do not, in fact, believe that it's necessary.

    But they do it anyway because they enjoy it.
     
    Elizabeth Conley likes this.
  19. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I don't know what your personal experience is with government contracts but I headed up a team that wrote a contractors proposal for a contract. There is no way for a contractor to bid a program unless they know exactly what the job entails.

    The SOP that was released sure caused a lot of trouble for the people who pointed out how to read the document so I still question just how out of date is was. If I remember correctly is was a 2008 version of the SOP that was released, what was the current SOP at the time of release?
     
  20. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Does it matter? It's painfully obvious that "SOP" is code for "Do whatever the (expletive deleted) you want to passengers - if you go too far, we'll deny you did it. And we'll deny that it's part of the 'SOP,' anyway, so you're off the hook."

    It's very clear that the TSA and its employees have no intention of ever letting the public know that they don't have any limitations on what they're "allowing" to happen.
     
    Lisa Simeone likes this.

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