Homeschoolers Changing Society and Striking a Blow for Freedom

Discussion in 'What's On Your Mind?' started by nachtnebel, Oct 18, 2012.

  1. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    Per this interesting article at the Rockwell site:


    Millions and millions of children getting a free perspective on the way things are, not indoctrinated by the state in explicitly Prussian-designed curriculums intended to promote societal homogeneity and docility to authority figures.
     
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  2. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    I'm with you, but for the dated Prussian line. Would that California schools had the same terrible Prussian orthodoxy they had in the 50's and 60's. I guarantee any schoolchild in former Prussia has a better grasp of world geography than a recent product of California schools. I get the pedagogy, but Prussian curriculums are hardly the problem...
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Look-See reading had already trashed California education by 1962.

    I spent Oct-Nov of 1962 in a 3rd-grade class at San Miguel Elementary School in Lemon Grove, suburb of San Diego. When it was time for the class to read, the overworked teacher (~30 students, including 4 Mikes) would have me walk around the room and explain words to them. If another student couldn't read a word, he/she would raise a hand & either the teacher or I would show up & read it to them. This was 3rd grade, and I appeared to be the only one who could read a book on his own.

    San Miguel was like nosediving into a dumpster after a year & a half in a DODDS/DODEA school outside Oslo & few months in Mountain Home, ID, where the school system was saturated with other Air Force brats.
     
  4. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Mike, I attended part of my high school years at the school that serves Vandenberg AFB. It may have been a factor of the makeup of the student body, as almost all of us were from families employed by the government, but I thought it was a pretty strong school. Of course at the time the high school was newly opened.
     
  5. FetePerfection

    FetePerfection Founding Member Coach

    Ahhh...now we know how "young" you are!
     
  6. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

    I dunno folks. We homeschool. It's terrifying, and it's hard. I'll be glad when the kids are launched to college, and I pray the schools will improve to the point our grandchildren can be sent to them.

    Homeschooling is deeply rewarding, I'll grant you that. It's also the hardest thing I've ever done.
     
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  7. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    Its not dated because public schools at least in CA are explicitly used for social engineering
     
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  8. So far, I feel pretty good about it. Granted, I'm only homeschooling a six year old at this time. But I've hit a point where I even question the value of college. I certainly intend to prepare my kids for college so that they have the option, but I almost hope they're of the mind that they're better off doing something else with that critical period. I might have been better off if I did.
     
  9. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Small world -- my mother & I were staying with my grandparent in Lemon Grove while my father was finishing missile training (ERCS, Blue Scout prototype) at Vandenburg.

    As an an Air Force brat, I experienced three different school environments, and the experiences of a lot of others seem to reflect this. Your high school in Vandenburg was probably in the 2nd category.
    1. Overseas schools run by DODDS (Dept. of Defense Dependent Services), later DODEA (Dept. of Defense Educational Activity). Family relocation to overseas posts requires longer assignments and the relocation benefits aren't available to the lower enlisted grades, where most of the slackers are weeded out. You end up with a schools where the parents are much more responsible than in most stateside school systems, and the quality of the students is higher (mostly military & embassy dependents; in Oslo we also got military & embassy dependants from other countries, e.g. Mexico, Germany, Japan, whose choices were Norwegian schools, the British school or ours). For many of us, the Oslo school was the standard against which we measured most other schools we attended.
    2. Stateside DOD relies on local school systems, but at many bases the military brats dominate the student population. You'll have more slacker parents but they're still getting weeded out. Mountain Home fit into this category, and I'd rank it #1 of all stateside schools attended.
    3. Local schools where the milbrat population is diluted, e.g. the 6 years we spent Fremont, Nebraska, while my father was assigned to ERCS. The military "base" (Scribner AFB) basically was an antenna field at a county airport run as an adjunct of Offutt AFB, and the small staff was spread out through towns in the area. I only recall one air force brat in any of my clases. It was a decent school system for its time although some teachers were under qualified (e.g. a few with two-year degrees) but just not as good as the others. It wasn't until I got into jr. high that they started to track & challenge more capable students.
     
  10. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Small world -- my mother & I were staying with my grandparent in Lemon Grove while my father was finishing missile training (ERCS, Blue Scout prototype) at Vandenburg.

    As an an Air Force brat, I experienced three different school environments, and the experiences of a lot of others seem to reflect this. Your high school in Vandenburg was probably in the 2nd category.
    1. Overseas schools run by DODDS (Dept. of Defense Dependent Services), later DODEA (Dept. of Defense Educational Activity). Family relocation to overseas posts requires longer assignments and the relocation benefits aren't available to the lower enlisted grades, where most of the slackers are weeded out. You end up with a schools where the parents are much more responsible than in most stateside school systems, and the quality of the students is higher (mostly military & embassy dependents; in Oslo we also got military & embassy dependants from other countries, e.g. Mexico, Germany, Japan, whose choices were Norwegian schools, the British school or ours). For many of us, the Oslo school was the standard against which we measured most other schools we attended.
    2. Stateside DOD relies on local school systems, but at many bases the military brats dominate the student population. You'll have more slacker parents but they're still getting weeded out. Mountain Home fit into this category, and I'd rank it #1 of all stateside schools attended.
    3. Local schools where the milbrat population is diluted, e.g. the 6 years we spent Fremont, Nebraska, while my father was assigned to ERCS. The military "base" (Scribner AFB) basically was an antenna field at a county airport run as an adjunct of Offutt AFB, and the small staff was spread out through towns in the area. I only recall one air force brat in any of my clases. It was a decent school system for its time although some teachers were under qualified (e.g. a few with two-year degrees) but just not as good as the others. It wasn't until I got into jr. high that they started to track & challenge more capable students.
     
  11. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Depends on what they are interested in doing. When I started programming you didn't need a degree, let alone a degree in computer science or engineering. Today you can't get your foot in the door without that engineering degree. I've even seen management reject an application from a very capable person whose degree wasn't from an accredited school. Not having that degree -- and preferably the right degree -- can close a lot of doors for someone.
     
  12. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Don't count on it. The docs put me on ice for while, so the real number is in question.
     
  13. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

    I never home schooled a 6 year old. I started with a hearing impaired 3rd grader and stressed out 6th grader, both somewhat behind by classical standards. We worked like mad to get them caught up.

    Now I'm teaching Middle School and High School to two bright kids. I'm teaching Pre Calculus, Piano, Spanish, Composition, Ancient History, American History, Physics, Literature, Composition, Algebra I. Thank God someone else is teaching Geography, SAT prep, Physical Science and Home Ec. I'm also very grateful the eldest graduated from her physical therapy program yesterday. Taking her to physical therapy was trashing our school day.

    My poor little brain is going to implode. I love it, but it's really, really overwhelming at times. Remember how you used to feel after final exams? I feel like that at least once a week, often twice.
     
  14. Mike -- I agree. I'm trying to frame college as something you need if you want a specialized kind of career, like nurse, lawyer, engineer, etc. But for other careers, the time and money may be better off spent in a business start-up, or as an apprentice of some sort, or exploring your area in some other way. My six year old is actually very serious about athletics (has been since about birth, which makes little sense because my husband and I are book nerds), so he might well go to high school and/or college for athletics alone.

    Elizabeth -- I can totally see the brain explosion with that load, and I admire your efforts! We started with a semi-unschool approach until we realized the boy appreciates structure, and yet doesn't like pressure on reading and writing. So we're taking a slow, less is more approach, reading cool chapter books before bed in hopes of motivating his reading (Harry Potter, Tom Sawyer, Willy Wonka, etc.), and doing a couple little workbook pages every day. He's also quite artistic, so he takes an awesome homeschool art class at a local art store, and of course he always has a sport or two going on. Then the rest of it is just going places and doing neat stuff. So far it's a manageable load, but I think as time progresses it ratchets up, especially when you get into areas that aren't my specialty, like higher level math and sciences (though my husband is well versed in those areas). I do have to say that for me, a gal who likes to do things on her own schedule, the thought of getting everybody up and ready at 7 to get to school on time sounds a lot harder than homeschooling, if that makes any sense!
     
  15. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

    Absolutely. That would totally trash our lives. I get everybody up at 0615. They're at their desks at 0700. The boy is a morning person; he starts with Algebra, a glass of milk and a breakfast sandwich. The girl is not a morning person, she starts with an ice cold Coke and Beautiful Feet Ancient History Through Literature. I'm really ashamed of the Coke, but she is soooooo not a morning person. We need structure, but we also need calm and quiet. Have you been in a public school lately? Pandalerium from dawn to dusk, with an omnipresent cacophony of demonic noise. It's intolerable.
     
  16. I finally got a chance to read the article in the OP, and liked it much. I'm solidly libertarian, so I saw myself in the article, but I have to say that many of the homeschool moms I mix with are of a more liberal persuasion. These are moms who don't want to subject their kids to the schooling model any more than the rest of us with a more conservative bent. It really does cut across the political spectrum.
     
  17. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

    I agree. Most of the home schooling families we know are Conservative Christians, with me being the only Libertarian in sight. All in all, the home schooling community reflects America.
     

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