Joe Williams Provides a Checkpoint Update From Atlanta

Discussion in 'Civil Rights & Privacy' started by CheckpointUSA, Aug 8, 2013.

  1. CheckpointUSA

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    I first wrote about Joe Williams from Atlanta and his run-in with a suspicionless sobriety checkpoint back in September of 2010. See:
    Atlanta Sobriety Checkpoint Claims Another Victim of Police Authoritarianism
    Recently, Joe sent me an update regarding his case. His email appears below:
    "In March 2010 I was stopped at a checkpoint in the city of Atlanta and arrested for disorderly conduct and driving without a license. Why was I arrested? Because I believe in my 4th Amendment rights when traveling within my own country and did not comply with the officer’s demand to see my driver’s license when I had done nothing wrong. The case was ultimately bound over to the state of Georgia where I anticipated putting this issue in front of a jury. More than 3 years after my arrest, the state failed to initiate proceedings against me thereby allowing the statute of limitations to expire. I feel this to be a partial victory in defending my natural born rights. If I had not stood firm in my belief to travel freely within my own country I could have pleaded to a lesser charge. I had to defend my Constitutional rights when those who took an oath of office to do so did not.
    Time and again I was told I had a slim chance of winning my case. I heard many times the Supreme Court says checkpoints are Constitutional. Yet, technically, the Supreme Court says “checkpoint stops are “seizures” within the meaning of the Fourth Amendment” and go on to say “Under the circumstance of these checkpoint stops….the government of public interest in making such stops outweighs the constitutionally protected interest of the private citizen.” In other words, the Supreme Court can grant an “EXCEPTION” to the 4th Amendment and the Supreme Court’s “EXCEPTION” allows for violating the Constitution. Said another way, IT’S CONSTITUTIONAL TO VIOLATE THE CONSTITUTION. So much for abiding by their oath of office.
    Sadly, America is becoming less about freedom and more about government surveillance, permission & control. Roadblocks & checkpoints operate with no individual reasonable suspicion of wrongdoing, seek to control and intimidate local communities as opposed to serve and protect them, and are intended to raise revenue for expanding government programs through fines, citations & arrest. When those sworn to defend the Constitution fail to do so who can the people turn to? The answer is themselves through rallies, protests, direct communication with public officials, voting, running for office, peaceful resistance & civil disobedience. The path chosen depends on the individual. Those who take an oath of office to defend the Constitution are becoming less reliable in executing that responsibility.
    The Constitution can only protect the people to the extent the people are willing to defend the Constitution. Unfortunately, it would seem more sacrifice is needed by the people to protect our rights & freedoms. When the people become to inconvenienced to defend their own freedoms, freedom will be lost"
    “The spirit of resistance to government is so valuable on certain occasions, that I wish it always to be kept alive.”
    — Thomas Jefferson​
    “The Constitution is not an instrument for government to restrain the people; it is an instrument for the people to restrain the government--lest it come to dominate our lives and our interests.“
    — Patrick Henry​
    “One declares so many things a crime that it becomes impossible for men to live without breaking laws.”
    — Ayn Rand​
    Joe Williams
    Atlanta, GA​
    My thanks go out to Joe for standing on principle, standing his ground and seeing it through. If even a small percentage of everybody seized at roadblocks across the country on a daily basis did what Joe did, these suspicionless seizures & searches of our persons would eventually grind to a halt.

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