My 5th Grader Was Groped By TSA - The Huffington Post‏

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Fisher1949, Apr 19, 2012.

  1. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    No, that's exactly the problem.

    The TSA is composed of Federal employees, who apparently are more protected by that government than the citizens who've granted them power.

    As far as I'm concerned, any TSA employee working a shift at the same checkpoint with a thief or other abuser and failing to report it has abrogated their oath.
     
  2. Well, it's one thing if shitbags are taking my order at McDonalds, and yet another if they're in a position where they are tasked with rooting around in my bag, walking off with my stuff (which was done to me recently by a clear non-shitbag, BTW, and I still felt violated), and feeling and rubbing my family's "sensitive areas". It's even worse when they are trained to intimidate us into submission with threats of huge fines, arrest, and no-fly status if we refuse whatever they want to do, even if it's clearly over the line. Even if shitbags get fired for their abuses, the damage is done to the people they abuse, and those people don't usually have much recourse.

    The simple answer for me is that presumed innocent civilians exercising their right (and it is indeed a right) to travel should not be processed like inmates, neither by shitbags nor friendly fascists.
     
  3. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    Inmates go through a different screening process from most people though.
     
  4. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Unfortunately, they will keep trying to justify the gropings to everyone else even when they clearly know that what they're doing is wrong. Why? Probably because they enjoy it so much.
     
  5. I'm saying that the standard TSA screening draws nearer and nearer to prisoners being processed for incarceration. We're just not that far away from routine strip searches and body cavity checks. We are now presumed guilty until we prove ourselves innocent at the airport. Oh, I know you all describe it as "resolving anomalies," but underneath the rhetoric it's the same process -- we have to prove ourselves innocent to your satisfaction or we don't fly, and we maybe get arrested in the process.
     
    Monica47, Lisa Simeone and Caradoc like this.
  6. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    I don't think of it as "proving your innocence", though. It's more like clearing an unknown. If I thought you were guilty of something, I'd report you rather than screen you. The process I use doesn't make you innocent of anything, it just makes you "known" rather than "unknown".

    I get why you have that point of view though.
     
  7. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    You left out "...while exposing our bodies to your gropes and our goods to your sticky fingers."
     
  8. Semantics. :)
     
    FaustsAccountant, barbell and Caradoc like this.
  9. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    This is pure bullsh*t. The AIT machines are known to have flaws in flagging false postives, and allowing false negatives. AND, as Jon Corbett proved, AIT suffers from design flaws in which certain areas are not covered AT ALL if certain materials are used. So there is NO question of "clearing" ANYONE who passes through them. It is completely a system of discouragement of idiots/amateurs by means of random rubdowns, random catches via AIT, and a huge numbers of unknowns getting by. In that context, where the TSA system resembles a 20-layer sieve, it is simply untrue that ANYONE going thru TSA into the sterile area is "known". TSA knows they don't know.

    The only way your statement could be true is if you did an actual strip search, squat and cough. TSA doesn't dare do this, but it is the only logical way that the process meets the words. Since TSA is satisfied with FAR less, they then should also be satisfied with a visual of 10 year-old Tommy's insulin pump, rather than stupidly and criminally pawing his penis and testicles.

    You should be beaten upside the head for doing this to someone. I hope you get why we'd have THAT point of view.
     
  10. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    I don't think a strip search is necessary, it's an acceptable risk.
     
  11. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Of course inmates are searched differently but they are incarcerated. But its not that much different to TSA Screening of people who have done nothing illegal unless in TSA's eyes trying to travel is now an illegal activity.

    NO PERSON SHOULD HAVE THEIR CROTCHES FELT UP IN ORDER TO TRAVEL, NOR ANY OTHER SENSITIVE BODY PART.

    People who do these things are vile beyond words.
     
  12. nachtnebel

    nachtnebel Original Member

    No sh*t. And it should be an acceptable risk to sh*tcan the stupid ETD swab tests that yield 100% bad results. An acceptable risk to sh*can AIT machines that yield 60% false positives and a high percentage of false negatives. An acceptable risk to quit the groin searches, butt massages, and boob massages done simply at random. An acceptable risk to stop terrorizing people with random ineffective bullsh*t measures from gate-gropes to BDO interrogations, from ETD swabs to drink tests. Ineffective and offensive. An acceptable risk.

    Your bosses, and you as a participant, have made flying (expletive deleted) for a lot of people, have discouraged a large number from flying altogether, and are helping to bankrupt airlines, all for an at-best slight increment in security. So much damage you do, for so little improvement. If our country were healthy, you'd all have been forced to stop, in quite unpleasant ways. Now that the country is sick, the maggots emerge in the flesh.
     
  13. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Posted at TSA News. I specifically ask parents to weigh in: My 5th-Grader Was Groped by TSA
     
  14. RB

    RB Founding Member

    So now it is TSA screeners jobs to determine if people are guilty of something? Really!

    Maybe you TSA types would do better if you just tried screening for WEI instead of all the other things you seem to be doing which has nothing to do with aviation security.
     
    TravelnMedic and Lisa Simeone like this.
  15. Argh! I still can't leave comments on Wordpress. Maybe I'll try it in Explorer or something. I would like to comment that I have two young children, and have had to make the unsettling decision that, should the TSA want to lay their hands on the kids, we will not be flying that day. Even it means being stranded away from home and having to find another way to get home to Alaska. I'm sad that we now live in a world where we have to prepare to make these sorts of decisions, but here we are, and we need to get used to it. If this crap is still going on when my kids are old enough to understand the nature of the police state (fifteen, sixteen maybe?), maybe we'll consider a flight or two where they make their own decisions about how to handle it. Maybe.

    You know, I've been meaning to mention -- Ron Paul was here a few months ago. We went to see him with a friend and her two young kids, so in total we had four kids aged five and under in our party, and they all had on heavy jackets or snowsuits. Security was wanding every single person going into the speech. But they didn't wand our kids, who could have easily had weapons hidden in their coats. It was interesting to me that children in heavy winter attire are considered an acceptable risk to a presidential candidate, and yet TSA equivocates on this issue with kids who are usually wearing clothes that can be cleared visually.
     
  16. DeafBlonde

    DeafBlonde Original Member

    HAH! That'll be the day. They're too busy patting themselves on their backs for making "great catches" for those "other things" that they have lost sight of the fact that if they DID search only for WEI, there would be nothing to crow about. Well, except maybe an occasional knife or unloaded gun, which they have admitted are not much of a threat anyway...especially since so many of them slip through their multi-layered baklava-security theatre clerkpoints).
     
    Lisa Simeone likes this.
  17. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Phoebe, do you want me to leave this comment for you with your name (Phoebepontiac) on it?
     
  18. Trying it in Explorer, where things look totally different. Does it take a minute for comments to show up? I posted a comment, but then everything just sat there. But I don't want to try it a bunch more times, and then have it post a bunch of times.
     
  19. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Usually they post immediately, though occasionally it can take a minute. But I just looked at the admin page, and your comment isn't listed, so that means it didn't take. What's the problem -- can you not sign up with Disqus?
     
  20. Okay, made it work!
     

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