Notice is back up @ TSA Blog (now you see it, now you dont, now you see it ...)

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Mike, Apr 12, 2013.

  1. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Timestamped 7:41 (EDT, I think) this evening, I've already saved a copy ...

    Explaining The Public Comment Period for Proposed Regulations




    The Federal Register is the official daily journal of the United States Government and is the designated vehicle for letting the public know about countless notices every year of proposed rulemaking from all federal agencies.
    Last month, the TSA published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) in the Federal Register regarding the use of Advanced Imaging Technology (AIT) as a screening method for commercial travel. As the proposed rule explains, individuals can submit comments via the online federal rulemaking docket, Regulations.gov. This process for proposed rules and soliciting comments is used government-wide and is the first step in promulgating regulations. TSA will review and analyze the public comments to develop a final rule related to the screening process using AIT.
    As we have said before, AIT is the best technology currently available to detect non-metallic objects and devices hidden on a passenger (while also detecting metallic and other threats), and is an important part of TSA’s multi-layered security effort.
    You can read and comment at the Federal eRulemaking portal through June 24, 2013.
    TSA Blog Team
    If you have a travel related issue or question that needs an immediate answer, you can contact us by clicking here.
    Posted by TSA Blog Team at 4/12/2013 07:41:00 PM 0 comments [​IMG]
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    Labels: advanced imaging technology, TSA Blog Team
     
  2. Doober

    Doober Original Member

    Looks like public pressure got to them.
     
  3. FliesWay2Much

    FliesWay2Much Original Member

    Bobby Boy quickly posted the almost-full page weekly gun report, so the notice is already pushed to the bottom. Guess you can do that when you make your jpegs as big as the real things. He was also very careful to not post the links to take you to the actual notice, including the docket number itself. He actually allowed a post with that information to make it through the censors.
     
  4. TSA News Blog

    TSA News Blog News Feed

    Magic_PhotoAtelier.jpg
    The case of the disappearing TSA Blog post continues.​
    As you know, The TSA Blog posted then removed a post announcing crucial public information. Then even the cached version of the post disappeared. Many of us noticed it, wrote about it, and asked the TSA about it. No telling if any mainstream media reporters asked. Given the collective “meh” they utter in regard to the TSA, I doubt it. Though Christopher Elliott, who writes for TSA News and for Elliott Blog, did. Apparently that woke them up at TSA headquarters.​
    Because suddenly Blogger Blob published this new post at The TSA Blog, albeit one that left out important information, which readers then provided in the comments.​
    In a nutshell: the public comment period is open, as we’ve been telling you since March 25th. The public comment period about the strip-search scanners and the invasive pat-downs is finally open, almost two years after the courts ordered the TSA to hold this public comment period.​
    You can leave a comment about the TSA in the public docket here.
    As we have been doing, we will repeat this information again and again until the end of the public comment period, which is June 24th. Please leave a comment at the public docket. Please stand up for civil liberties.​
    (Photo: PhotoAtelier/Flickr Creative Commons)
     

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