Some days things just don't turn out well ...

Discussion in 'What's On Your Mind?' started by Mike, Jul 14, 2013.

  1. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    1.5 ton cow???? 3,000 pounds of cow?

    UK Telegraph: Brazilian man dies after cow falls through his roof on top of him (July 13 2013)

    Joao Maria de Souza, 45, had been in bed with his wife Leni when the animal fell through the ceiling of their home in Caratinga, southeast Brazil.
    The cow is believed to have escaped from a nearby farm and climbed onto the roof of the couple's house, which backs onto a steep hill on Wednesday night.
    The corrugated roof immediately gave way and the one-and-a-half-ton animal fell eight feet onto Mr de Souza's side of the bed.
    Rescuers took Mr de Souza to hospital with a fractured left leg but no other obvious injuries, reporting that he was conscious and talking normally.
    Hours later however he died from internal bleeding while still waiting to be seen by doctors, according to his family.
     
  2. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    Wow, just... wow. Now I am interested in how the cow got onto the roof... How... Ok, I am at a loss here, I have nothing.
     
  3. RB

    RB Founding Member

    From what I read the structure was built up against a hill, so the hill formed the rear of the cabin and the roof line was built into the hill. I have seen such done in some old west buildings. It made the building essentially three sided with a hill making up the back wall. Many times a sod roof was used but from the picture I saw this was corrugated tin and other stuff.

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/wor...cow-falls-through-his-roof-on-top-of-him.html
     
  4. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    Wondered that too when I didn't read past the headline. Then I figured it was some sort of lean-to/dugout, like RB:
    The stranger thing isn't access to the roof, but that a cow chose to walk out on corrogated tin. Cats, maybe.
    That's an unhappy (curious?) cow and some serious bad luck. The brother-in-law lamented:
     
  5. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    Yup, I missed the second pic the first time I read through. Based on experiences at farms in this region, the same material they used for runways (corrugated steel sections - http://www.flickr.com/photos/mackandtim/2703066045/ ) , is used to fill in a lot of spaces in cricks and hollows (said "Hollers" around here) where washouts occur. I guess maybe the cow didn't even think about it? Sad that it happened, even sadder that he had to wait until it was too late (supposing they could have helped him in any case).
     
  6. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I think you are confusing marsden matting ( or some variation) with corragated tin.

    Marsden matting is used to build runways in a hurry and was used during WWII. I remember some ramp areas at Naples still having it during the '80's.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mackandtim/2703066045/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marsden_Matting

    Corragated tin has been a stock building material in the south since before my time. And I remember houses, barns, and other out buildings that used it on the roof and walls and to fill in the chinks and hollers.

    http://www.montanawoodproducts.com/...-products/reclaimed-metal_corrugated-tin2.jpg

    http://www.featurepics.com/FI/Thumb300/20081023/Old-House-Corrugated-Tin-Roof-940652.jpg
     
  7. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    You are right, I have seen much more of the Marsden Matting employed, although I think recall seeing the steel slatted version used in the mountains a couple of times in a heavy crop rotation area, good catch RB. That stuff will be found in this place thousands of years from now by archaeologists, it is everywhere. The corrogated tin is used on probably half of the roofing for non residence buildings on all the farms and rural areas around here. Some of it is pulled down every couple of decades, smoothed out, reapplied with some sealer in the holes and put right back into use in the same place. I can remember doing that on a curing barn near my grandmothers as a teenager... that was some hot and miserable work.
     
  8. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    New refrain to the song about the cow kicking the lantern ...

    It'll be crunch time in the old house tonight.
     
    Rugape and TravelnMedic like this.
  9. TravelnMedic

    TravelnMedic Original Member

    ROFLMAO... New twist on a oldie... well played sir well played.
     
    Rugape likes this.
  10. Frank

    Frank Original Member

    Much like that guy who spent 36 hours in jail having a stroke instead of a stroke center.
     

Share This Page