Spokesman-Review fluff piece about how TSA assists disabled passengers

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Mike, Sep 3, 2013.

  1. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Sounds great unless they happen to break your urostomy bag ... twice, or if you happen to be one of a number of elder women groped & poked in the private molestation booths.

    I'll believe this when we've gone 6-12 months with no new credible horrors of people being abused by TSA.

    Spokesman-Review: TSA offers assistance to passengers during screening process (Sept 3 2013)

    TSA staff will accompany people with special needs through the screening process. The service is available for children, the elderly and people with developmental disabilities or dementia. It’s also available for people who have prosthetics, medical devices, guide dogs, religious dress or medications necessary for travel.
    ...
    Family members and friends who are helping travelers can ask for assistance on their behalf, officials said. People needing medications during their travel are allowed to take an amount that will get them to their destinations, including liquid medicine. The TSA’s passenger support program launched in January. A staff of 2,600 specialized screeners handle security procedures for special-needs passengers. Screeners have been trained to handle each situation appropriately for each condition or need, TSA officials said. Screenings can be done confidentially.
    ...
    Lorie Dankers, public affairs manager for TSA, said any passenger can ask for a private screening. She urged travelers to call TSA if they are unsure about getting through security. TSA asks people seeking special help not to call until 72 hours before departure so that they can be certain that they will be flying and of the time of departure. “There’s really no concern too small,” Dankers said. “It’s whatever people want.”

    Whatever people want? How about competent security without the theater? Europe & Australian seem to manage that just fine, yet their planes aren't falling out of the air ...

    The reporter's email is Mikep@Spokesman.Com
     
  2. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    I wouldn't limit that to elderly women. Anyone who gets groped and poked in the private molestation booths by an employee of the TSA has been violated.

    If they had probable cause, or even reasonable suspicion, and the grope-and-poke were performed by an actual representative of law enforcement instead of a GED-wielding knuckle-dragging idiot thug with no better prospects in life, well, that'd be an improvement.
     
  3. Monica47

    Monica47 Original Member

    People needing medications during their travel are allowed to take an amount that will get them to their destinations, including liquid medicine.

    So what do you do with the medication you need AFTER you arrive at your destination? Common sense says not to put it in checked luggage in case it's lost or it's stolen.
     
  4. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Screeners are not medical personnel. In particular, they are not a passenger's physician, nurse or pharmacist. They should not be questioning the need for or quantity of specific items. Unfortunately, that doesn't mean they won't.

    Never put prescription medications in checked luggage, ever.
     
  5. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Another article popped up for the Spokesman-Review, likely something in a side-column or highlighted box in the print version. TUG is going to be undergoing a major upgrade in a few days/2-3 weeks. I will try to highlight this TSA contact info. The (855) prefix is a national toll-free number.

    Note that this even includes people who "have ... religious dress ... necessary for travel". I'd like to see TSA's original wording on that -- this is a very broad commitment.

    Spokesman-Review: How to arrange TSA assistance through screening (Aug 3 2013)
    • Who’s eligible: The service is available for children, the elderly, people with developmental disabilities or dementia, or people who have prosthetics, medical devices, guide dogs, religious dress or medications necessary for travel.
    • How to get help: Travelers who have special needs can get personalized help passing through airport security by calling (855) 787-2227 three days in advance of flights, or by emailing TSA-ContactCenter@dhs.gov.
     
  6. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Nor are they law enforcement, but they like to pretend that, too. And the less qualified they are to pretend at something, the more likely they are to do so. Look at how many TSA thugs have told people they "don't need that much juice just to fly with a toddler" - among other lies and misapprehensions the TSA pulls on an hourly basis.

    The organization must be disbanded, and every current employee recognized as a sexual deviant at best, and a traitor to their own country more likely.
     

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