Teen Blames TSA For Broken Insulin Pump

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Fisher1949, May 8, 2012.

  1. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    I do not think we need to know the exact number for the purposes of this discussion. Considering the very existence of this site and similar sites, where you have a complaint board with members that actively search of news stories, blog posts, etc of complaints, the fact that you have yet to find a single instance of a pump being damaged due to the scanners is quite remarkable. While I agree it may be impossible to know how many have been broken, how improbable is it that none of those people with broken pumps have made it known? Even now with this news story no one is coming out with their broken pump story? What is the likelihood of that?
     
  2. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    Learned? That's doubtful. I suspect you haven't learned anything from this thread, you merely reaffirm your previously held opinion.
     
  3. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    I think your opinion is coloured by your hatred of the TSA. I think you've disregarded the points I've made just so you can come to the conclusion that I'm a horrible person and a danger, to go along with your narrative. Nothing I could've said would have led you to a different outcome.

    This is what happens when you drink the koolaid and refuse to listen to reason.
     
  4. FaustsAccountant

    FaustsAccountant Original Member

    Good grief.

    The whole point of this is the Agent made a bad decision to tell the girl to go through the scanner despite the doctor's warning.

    And Ciarin also is making a bad decision in agreeing with his coworker.
    Now if both would just swallow their misplace pride for a second and admit it, admit this is a bad decision. a lot of people could just move on.

    EVeryone on both sides makes bad decisions, both the TSA agents and some passengers at some point or another.
    The sore point here is the refusal to admit a mistake. But rather to bullfacedly chest puff go on and on relentlessly.
     
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  5. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    You haven't made any points. You've provided no evidence of anything you've stated. You've simply reasserted your opinion (repeatedly) that you're smarter than the people who build the things, and the people who prescribe them.
     
    FaustsAccountant likes this.
  6. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    I think there's a difference between refusing to admit a mistake, and not agreeing that a mistake took place.
     
  7. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    Not really, but whatever. If you want to have a rational discussion with me, let me know.
     
  8. FaustsAccountant

    FaustsAccountant Original Member

    And you're illustrating that.
    Come on, you're big enough to take one and admit to agree it was a mistake.
     
    Lisa Simeone and Caradoc like this.
  9. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Evidence suggests otherwise.
     
  10. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    I'll admit a mistake when I agree it's a mistake. I'm not going to lie just to make you happy.
     
  11. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    I think we've taken this discussion as far as it will go. We're not going to agree.
     
  12. FaustsAccountant

    FaustsAccountant Original Member

    If you're a government agent with the sort of power to dictate and affect the lives the people whom you are entrusted to keep safe, you do own a bit of something to really consider, without your personal beliefs and pride, with what is honestly better/healthy for those people. Try to look at things from the people's side.
     
    phoebepontiac likes this.
  13. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I'm afraid you will need a mirror to see who is drinking the Kool-Aid..

    I have provided you with direct information from two pump manufacturers, not my opinions.

    I believe that the people who are responsible to people using the product, the manufacturers, have an idea of the capabilities of the device. You seem to care not what the makers state.

    The question isn't "do the TSA scanners damage these devices" , the question is "can the TSA scanners damage the devices". Since the pumps are critical to a person being alive or possibly dead we have to give deference to the possibility that the TSA scanners can damage the pump. A malfunctioning pump may deliver the wrong amounts of insulin among other problems and place a persons life in jeopardy. I'm not going to take that responsibility on my shoulders and will do all I can to see that you or any other person doesn't hazard a person out of ignorance.

    It is your lack of concern for the health of people who use pumps and completely ignoring valid and verifiable documentation that concerns me. The points you have been making matter little since they are no more than uneducated opinions.

    If your acts of recommending TSA Whole Body Scanners to people who are using insulin pumps are correct TSA procedure then you have little to worry about.

    Mike or any other Coach, I'm am requesting that this thread be locked to preserve all statements made and if possible I would like the IP that Ciarin is posting from. I will use the IP for no other purpose than reporting my concerns to DHS/TSA.
     
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  14. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Of course not. You reserve that for getting your paycheck.
     
  15. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

    So basically you're saying "no u!"

    What do you do about the people who go through the scanners with their pumps because they want to?
     
  16. RB

    RB Founding Member

    That is their personal choice. Neither you nor I have any responsibility at that point.
     
    Caradoc likes this.
  17. Ciarin

    Ciarin Member

  18. It strikes me that we are not allowed to use portable electronic devices when a plane is taking off or landing. As I understand it, there is a possibility that a portable electronic device could interfere with radio communications, which could endanger the flight. Now, if I turn on a Kindle while the flight is taking off, or even a cell phone or laptop, I'm personally pretty sure nothing bad will happen. I do have some experience with this, too -- private pilot single engine land license in high school (not current). If portable electronics were an imminent threat to aviation communications systems, I'm pretty sure I would have learned about it, but in my experience the systems are pretty solid.

    But I admit that my own experience is not infallible, that I am not an engineer or even a highly experienced pilot. In that I don't want to mess with even the remote chance of taking down my own airliner, I go ahead and respect the rule, keeping my devices off until I'm told it's cool to turn them on.
     
  19. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Not to mention failure to follow the directions of the flight crew.

    But if someone says, "I can't go through the scanner because the manufacturer of my insulin pump says I shouldn't," they're harassed by know-nothing dullards, threatened with DYWTFT, and occasionally the "interference with the screening process" nonsense.
     
    Lisa Simeone and phoebepontiac like this.
  20. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I do think TSA should make a strong effort to make sure that pumpers know not to use WBI.
     

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