TSA Exposed my Breast after pulling my dress down on 2/19/12

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Holycowjenny, Feb 23, 2012.

  1. Holycowjenny

    Holycowjenny Original Member

    Yea, I am sure if it does get any main stream coverage people are going to ask, "Why would you wear a strapless dress to begin with?" So I am prepared to answer that question.
     
  2. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Don't let them browbeat you. Those are the same kind of people who ask rape victims, "what were you wearing?"
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    "just because" is all the reason you need.
     
    Holycowjenny likes this.
  4. FaustsAccountant

    FaustsAccountant Original Member

    That's so true, I've received "You must have done something or had a scowl to be picked out for the RANDOM search."
    If only they can hear themselves. But until then, you know you did nothing wrong, so hold onto that.

    I fly in and out of MCO alot as well as Austin and Houston, I completely understand the need to dress for weather and humidity, although it's usually for work so I cannot go bare shoulders.
     
    exbayern and Holycowjenny like this.
  5. exbayern

    exbayern Original Member

    I wear a knit skirt for the reasons Lisa posted. I don't tend to wear a dress as much/most of my flights are long haul and I like to be able to change my top part even if I cannot shower mid-trip or on arrival, and a dress doesn't permit that.

    Unfortunately, I think that you also need to be prepared for a lot of people, and especially women, to blame YOU. There will be women who will say that it is your fault for what you chose to wear. Now, you could have been wearing a maxi dress, with a jacket or cardigan etc on top, and covered every inch of skin, and still had the same experience. But many people will say that you should have known better, that you shouldn't have worn a skirt/dress, and that you shouldn't have worn that particular dress.

    I say that is RUBBISH! Why on earth are people allowing these bullies to dictate how they dress, and what they wear, and then blaming their fellow passengers for the end result? Millions of women around the world fly every day in skirts, dresses, saris, or other items of clothing which are cut in a similar fashion, and we are not subjected to this. I had a pat down at LHR the other day in a skirt, and have them every now and again at FRA. Those airports have poor reputations over at the other site, but there was nothing offensive or obtrusive about my pat downs there. Nobody puts their hand up my skirt, into my crotch, touches my inner thighs, makes me lunge, or do any of the other things which TSA regularly does when I wear a skirt.

    The only groups of skirted women in America who seem to have a small concern about this is groups who choose to dress modestly. And even then, there doesn't seem to be much outcry amongst them. I am sickened and disgusted with how we women treat each other, and this is just another example of how we look to blame other women instead of the system for what is happening.
     
  6. Holycowjenny

    Holycowjenny Original Member

    Na, won't let them browbeat me...but you know how peopel can be...and no matter what, I did not ask for it. I have a pure heart. :)
    Thanks!
     
  7. Holycowjenny

    Holycowjenny Original Member

    And thank you for that Exbayern! I agree with you...My dress went to my ankles...I thought it was appropiate, just showing my shoulders though...I told a TSA agent at my connecting flight what happend as far as my breast being exposed, (so she would be cautious) and she was really nice, and hardly touched me at all....I put my arms out to the side and she said, "Oh, you can keep your arms down, you don't need to do that." So I am not sure if they have different protocal? Or if she was just being respectful and cautious. Yea, women can be brutal in blaming other women. Men, can too as well....This could happen to anyone. Thanks for the comment! :)
     
  8. exbayern

    exbayern Original Member

    I have asked this now of several higher than front line TSA staff, as my skirt is not checked 100 percent of the time. I have been told over and over that ALL skirts and dresses are to be checked ALL of the time at EVERY checkpoint in America, whether contract screeners or TSA.

    That isn't what actually happens, however, as I have about a 75% check rate. I was told that this is because some screeners are not following protocol, and those who do not check ALL skirts, or who are treating us as you were treated by the second screener ie with respect, are not doing their job correctly. Unfortuantely, every time I question this I feel that I am bringing it to someone's attention, and they will then reinforce with the screeners to check ALL skirts/dresses. Hence I am doing us a disservice by even asking for clarification. :(
     
    Holycowjenny likes this.
  9. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Are we all going to have to shift to jump suits so we can remain clothed and not have TSA Pervs sticking their hands downs our pants?
     
    Lisa Simeone likes this.
  10. FaustsAccountant

    FaustsAccountant Original Member

    Somehow I think that if we did that in large(r) numbers, TSA would actively find an even more humiliating "policy" to 'address jumpsuits' just to either spite us and/or assert their ah-thor-a-tee make more sure :rolleyes:we're safe.
     
    Lisa Simeone likes this.
  11. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Funny you should suggest that. When I finally agreed -- "reluctantly" doesn't begin to describe it -- to continue with a trip to India in 2010 (which ended up getting canceled because of father-in-law's health) to keep the peace in the marriage, I plotted out an entire self-protecting outfit.

    I searched the internet for full-length bodystockings and ended up buying two -- one black and one nude -- since I wasn't sure what dress I would end up wearing. I didn't want those filthy perverts touching my skin if I got hauled aside for a grope.

    So I planned to wear the bodystocking over my lingerie, then a full body briefer over the bodystocking, then pantyhose, then the dress. I figured once I got through security, I could go to the restroom and take off the body briefer and bodystocking, put the pantyhose back on, and off I'd go. (This was also before the pervs started wandering into bathrooms and other places for "chat-downs.")

    Unbelievable that I had to go through this whole thing to protect myself from being sexually assaulted at the airport. Simply unbelievable.

    FOAD, TSA, DHS, and all of you sick, twisted rights-shredding thugs. FOAD.
     
  12. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Monica47 and Holycowjenny like this.
  13. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Nah, the shiny cloth alarms in the scanners.
     
  14. RB

    RB Founding Member

    That's ok, proves the Strip Search Machines are a waste of money.
     
  15. DeafBlonde

    DeafBlonde Original Member

    COOL!! And when the TDC tries to get us to play the name-game we can reply: "Mork, from the planet Ork. Nanu, nanu! *holding up hand with only middle and ring finger separated*
     
    Holycowjenny likes this.
  16. Holycowjenny

    Holycowjenny Original Member

     
  17. Holycowjenny

    Holycowjenny Original Member

    @ Exbayern...I see what you are saying...and if they are supposed to do it everytime and are not (which you confirmed for me) they CAN get sued for discrimination. When I was working for a property management company, we were trained about discrimination as it was a tax credit property. We could not even answer a person if they asked if there were alot of black people living at the property. Our answer had to be, "Anyone that meets the criteria can live here". (Fair Housing Rights). We could not answer and say, "well, not really." Just that alone we could be shut down, sued and charged with a felony of discrimination. We would get shopped with people that have hidden cameras, to see if we were in compliance. We had to treat everyone the same. For instance, we could not walk one way for one person that we showed the property to, and a different way for another person showing the property to, because we could get sued and charged. I think if people would start making them treat us the same, like you were attempting to do, and if they do not, file a suit for discimination that may help. (Just a thought for some kind of solution and pressure to comply with the law and turn it around on them.) This is a federal law (Discrimination) and it is a felony. Based on disablity, relgion, martial status, gender, nationality, any of us could fit into a protected class, and claim discrimination. Not to abuse it, of course, but they are clearly not treating everyone the same. So Exberyn you confirmed for me what they are supposed to do. The reason I believe that they start telling everyone to enforce the pat down when wearing a dress/skirt after you complain, is because they can get sued. That is my oppinion of course, but that is what I see. ;)
     
  18. RB

    RB Founding Member

    The problem is that TSA employees have limited immunity and cases against TSA can only be heard in Federal Courts of Appeal where evidence may not be presented.

    The legislation that created TSA is a nightmare for the public. Congress is the only entity that can fix this blunder and we all know how much our Congress is getting done these days.
     
  19. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    I don't believe TSA agents are worried one jot about getting sued. Sorry, Jenny, but they do what they want, when they want, how they want, to whom they want. A glance at the forums here at Travel Underground prove that. They face no disciplinary measures, and certainly not discrimination lawsuits. Are you kidding -- at Newark there was an entire cadre of TSA thugs who called themselves "Mexican hunters" because they went around harassing people they thought were Hispanic.

    There is no consistency among TSA agents, supervisors, airports, locations within airports, types of dress, types of passengers, you name it. The procedures are all over the map, and often made up on the spot. Again, just take a look at the threads here at TUG or at the Master Lists to see.
     
  20. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Torts are still heard in district court. There are at least two such lawsuits currently underway; in both cases the screeners are being sued in their individual capacities (in one I believe the judge dismissed TSA as a defendant because the screeners exceeded the scope of the duties, in the other I don't think TSA even started out as a defendant).

    What has to start in the Court of Appeals are challenges to TSAs procedures & "orders", e.g. SOP.
     
    Holycowjenny likes this.

Share This Page