TSA Investigation Underway After Driver Accidentally Enters Taxiway At Philadelphia International Ai

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Fisher1949, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. Fisher1949

    Fisher1949 Original Member Coach

  2. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Very dangerous, my wife could have landed her 757 on that taxiway.

    Fortunately that was only in a sim. :eek:
     
    barbell likes this.
  3. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I'm sure some TSA Spokeshole will be along to say that TSA is not responsible.
     
    Lisa Simeone, KrazyKat and barbell like this.
  4. Frank

    Frank Original Member

    TSA investigates two things: Jack and (expletive deleted). And Jack left town.
     
    Lisa Simeone and barbell like this.
  5. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    TSA usually conducts investigations into things like this in case there is a change needed in procedure either locally or nationwide to address this type of incident not happening again. I know that the regulations covering reporting of incidents and security guidelines (on a basic level anyway) are covered in 49 CFR 1542. I am not certain what the investigation will reveal in this case, but based on what I read, it will probably be something along the lines of make certain that the LEOs manning the gate areas are paying attention.
     
  6. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Look at that - you appear to have been correct.
     
    barbell likes this.
  7. Frank

    Frank Original Member

    Just like they're not responsible for iPad and cash thefts. :td:
     
  8. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I have little doubt that anyone manning a gate knows they are suppose to pay attention. Since TSA has an oversight responsibility in total airport security it would seem that not only was the person manning the gate at fault but TSA fell down on the job ensuring compliance.

    But since TSA always disavows any kind of responsibility I'm sure this won't slow TSA employees down on their way to the next strip search of an elder.
     
    KrazyKat likes this.
  9. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    The blame lies with the individual(s) tasked with staffing the gate they came through. You could make a case that is similar to the military - where Private A was standing guard and something went wrong on his watch because of something he did - the SOG bore the brunt of the chewing from the head shed, but Private A is the one that wound up with the Article 15 or punitive actions past that. I think a more apt comparison would be these are the people that made the rules and enforce the regulations, now their primary objective should be to study what happened, and try to formulate a better/different plan that can help minimize the opportunity of this happening again.
     
  10. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    If there needs to be further study or changes to procedure just to direct those manning the gate areas to be paying attention, those responsible--not just the lone checkpoint keeper-- need to be retired.

    These lost drivers were driving on the airside for some time and even got out of the car at one point. This is a much bigger failure. There was no redundancy or there were a lot of other people not doing their jobs.
    Or, maybe the airfield is usually made available by TSA but in this case the drivers were innocents not insiders.

    Are all the resources focused on humiliating passengers and contracts for high-tech toys?
    I feel it is improper to make a military analogy because the armed forces are trained well and probably 10,000% more competent than TSA in such work.
     
  11. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I believe I said just that.

    Both the person manning the gate is at fault and the oversight process is at fault. Whatever reason for the person manning the gate to be inattentive is the core problem. The root cause of that could be working two jobs, personal illness, sick kids at home, family problems and so on. The oversight issue would revolve around issues such as how often the person must check in, if any roving supervisors are out and about, and so forth. If I understand the process correctly the airports Security Plan must be submitted to TSA for review and approval. So any weaknesses in the Security Plan would land square on TSA's front porch.

    In this case it was just a lost driver but what might have happened if a person or persons were trying to infiltrate the airport?
     
    barbell likes this.
  12. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    Nothing like external accountability.:rolleyes:
    Well, BD, the many layers of security may need to allow for the removal of stolen property too. I mean, there is only so much you can hold in an extra sewn-in pocket.
     
  13. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    Look the other way much?
     
  14. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    Which leads one to wonder just how people migrate from the military into the TSA... Is it because they're angry at the citizens and want an excusable way to abuse them? Or have they just not learned any marketable skills while serving their country?

    Given the behavior of the average TSA employee, it's clear that "discipline," "honesty," "integrity," and "upholding the Constitution of the United States of America" are all values that TSA employees utterly fail to bring to the table.
     
  15. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    There has been a great deal more gang-activity in the military of late.
     
  16. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    And it's apparently been part of the TSA for quite some time.
     
  17. Rugape

    Rugape Original Member

    I understand what you are saying, it could have been someone with nefarious intent and that makes this a pretty big fail. From what I read, the TSA has to approve the plan, but I am uncertain of the involvement on a day to day basis, I know that regulatory has some interaction with this process, but it is not articulated in a publication that I can put my hands on. I will look around and speak to some of our Inspectors and see if there is something in the public forum I can point to that outlines the process and link it here. I believe the Lions share of blame can't be placed on the organization that approved a security plan, if the break down was not a flaw in the plan itself.
     
  18. barbell

    barbell Coach Coach

    This is TSA we're talking about.

    There most certainly is a flaw in the plan itself.
     
  19. Caradoc

    Caradoc Original Member

    The TSA *is* the flaw. Along with their dishonest, ineffective, and thieving personnel.
     
    KrazyKat likes this.
  20. RB

    RB Founding Member

    If we use the incident of TSA workers climbing on and damaging airplanes so they could determine if the aircraft were locked then it is clear that TSA plays some role in verifying security, that is unless TSA realized its employees don't have the skills to be around dangerous airplanes.
     

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