Arrested TSA Employee Two more Atlanta screeners indicted for drug smuggling: Richard C. Cook, II, & Timothy G. Gregory

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Mike, Aug 8, 2012.

  1. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    U.S. Attorney's Office Press Release: Ex-TSA Officers Indicted for Conspiring and Attempting to Smuggle Drugs Through Hartfield-Jackson

    Two ex-TSA Officers were indicted today for conspiring and attempting to smuggle cocaine through Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport at a time when they were employed by TSA, announced Sally Quillian Yates, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia. Richard C. Cook, II, 27, of Henry County, Georgia; and Timothy G. Gregory, 25, of DeKalb County, Georgia, have been indicted by a federal grand jury for multiple counts of drug trafficking. In addition to the cocaine charges, Cook was charged with attempting to possess with intent to distribute heroin.

    ...

    According to United States Attorney Yates, the charges and other information presented in court: Beginning in January 2012, on multiple occasions, Cook and Gregory misused their positions as officers with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to smuggle what they believed to be illegal drugs through Atlanta’s airport security.

    More specifically, on January 11, 2012, Cook met with two undercover officers, both of whom were posing as drug cartel members. During the meeting, the undercover officers provided Cook with three kilograms of fake drugs, which Cook believed to be heroin, and $3,500 in cash, which was partial payment to Cook to smuggle the fake drugs through airport security.

    Thereafter, Cook, who was wearing his TSA uniform, went to the airport, transported the sham drugs through the TSA security checkpoint, and delivered the sham drugs to an undercover officer inside the terminal. Cook was then paid another $4,000 in cash, which was the remaining payment for smuggling the sham drugs through security.

    Similarly, on January 26, 2012, Cook met with an undercover officer before Cook reported for his TSA shift at the airport. During this meeting, the undercover officer provided Cook with three kilograms of fake drugs that Cook believed to be heroin and $4,000 in cash, which was partial payment to Cook to smuggle the fake drugs through airport security. Thereafter, Cook, who was wearing his TSA uniform, went to the airport, transported the fake kilograms through the TSA security checkpoint, and delivered the sham drugs to another undercover officer in the terminal. The undercover officer then paid Cook $3,500, which was the remaining portion of Cook’s fee for smuggling the sham drugs through security. In both sting operations, Cook believed that he was smuggling heroin through airport security.

    In February 2012, Cook resigned from the TSA. However, Cook recruited TSA Officer Gregory to assist with the drug smuggling operation. Cook introduced Gregory to the undercover officers who were posing as drug traffickers and received a referral fee of $1,000.

    On February 24, 2012, an undercover officer provided Gregory with five kilograms of fake cocaine and $5,000 in cash. Thereafter, Gregory, who was wearing his TSA uniform, went to the airport, transported the fake cocaine through the TSA security checkpoint, and delivered the sham drugs to another undercover officer in the terminal.

    On May 4, 2012, undercover officers provided Gregory with 10 kilograms of fake cocaine, which Gregory had agreed to transport from Atlanta to Commerce, Georgia.

    The indictment charges each defendant with one count of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and multiple counts of substantive drug trafficking. The most serious of the charges carry a maximum sentence of life in prison and a fine of up to $10,000,000. In determining the actual sentence, the court will consider the United States Sentencing Guidelines, which are not binding but provide appropriate sentencing ranges for most offenders.

    Atlanta Journal-Constitution: Ex-TSA workers indicted in airport drug-smuggling

    Two former Transportation Security Administration officers were indicted Tuesday on charges they conspired to smuggle cocaine and heroin through Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

    ...

    Starting in January, Cook allegedly began smuggling what he thought was cocaine and heroin through the Atlanta airport for federal agents posing as drug smugglers. The "drugs" he delivered to undercover agents, however, were fake. He moved the packages past security checkpoints while in uniform and was paid thousands of dollars for his involvement, prosecutors said.

    Prosecutors said Cook quit the TSA in February but allegedly recruited Gregory, another TSA officer, to help keep the drug-smuggling operation going. Cook allegedly introduced Gregory to undercover officers posing as drug traffickers and received a referral fee of $1,000.

    7th Space: Ex-TSA Officers Indicted for Conspiring and Attempting to Smuggle Drugs Through Hartfield-Jackson

    Two ex-TSA Officers were indicted today for conspiring and attempting to smuggle cocaine through Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport at a time when they were employed by TSA, announced Sally Quillian Yates, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia. Richard C Cook, II, 27, of Henry County, Georgia; and Timothy G Gregory, 25, of DeKalb County, Georgia, have been indicted by a federal grand jury for multiple counts of drug trafficking. In addition to the cocaine charges, Cook was charged with attempting to possess with intent to distribute heroin.
     
  2. Fisher1949

    Fisher1949 Original Member Coach

    We're up to 97 screeners in less than two years. Halinski sad we should expect to have criminals groping us at the checkpoint. I guess he didn't specify what kind of criminals.
     
  3. N965VJ

    N965VJ Original Member

  4. These incidents hitting the press doesn't seem to have a deterrent effect. Except, maybe, deterring people from flying.
     
  5. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    The feds aren't as forthcoming with regard to mugshots as local jurisdictions. Occasionally you might see one in a press release, but those are the exception rather than the rule. Federal prison facilities don't provide photos of their "guests".
     
  6. Elizabeth Conley

    Elizabeth Conley Original Member

  7. Fisher1949

    Fisher1949 Original Member Coach

    Only three more to go to reach 100 in less than two years.
     
  8. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Guilty plea from Timothy G. Gregory ...

    WDEF: Former airport worker pleads guilty in drug plot

    A former security worker has pleaded guilty in a plot to smuggle drugs through the Atlanta airport. U.S. Attorney Sally Quillian Yates says the guilty plea was given by 26-year-old Timothy G. Gregory, a former Transportation Security Administration employee. Yates says Gregory tried to smuggle cocaine through security at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.

    Also 7th Space: Ex-TSA Officer Pleads Guilty to Conspiring and Attempting to Smuggle Drugs Through Hartsfield-Jackson
     
  9. Monica47

    Monica47 Original Member

    http://www.ajc.com/news/news/local/2nd-former-tsa-officer-pleads-guilty-in-drug-case/nSftt/

    A former federal officer pleaded guilty Wednesday to attempting to smuggle drugs through Atlanta’s Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport.
    Richard C. Cook II, 27, of Henry County is the second former Transportation Security Administration officer to plead guilty in the case after Timothy G. Gregory of DeKalb County pleaded guilty Oct. 4, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Atlanta said.
    According to prosecutors, Cook met with undercover officers posing as drug cartel members on Jan. 11. He was given 3 kilograms of a substance he believed to be heroin and $3,500 in cash. In return, he smuggled the fake heroin through airport security and delivered it to an undercover officer inside the terminal, where he was given another $4,000 in cash, prosecutors said.
    Undercover officers carried out a similar operation on Jan. 26, again supplying Cook with fake drugs and paying him a total of $7,500 in cash.
    Cook resigned from the TSA in February, but not before recruiting Gregory to participate in the drug smuggling operation. He introduced Gregory to undercover officers and received a $1,000 “finder’s fee,” prosecutors said. Gregory was arrested after being caught in two undercover operations in February and May.
    Gregory’s sentencing is scheduled for Dec. 18, and Cook’s on Jan. 3. Both face a maximum sentence of life in prison and a fine of $10 million.
     
  10. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Richard's goose is Cooked ...

    The Telegraph: 2nd ex-airport worker pleads guilty in drug plot

    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution ( http://bit.ly/TchKqR) reports that the guilty plea was given Wednesday by 27-year-old Richard C. Cook II. Authorities say Cook is the second former Transportation Security Administration employee to try to smuggle cocaine through Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport. The U.S. Attorney's office says Cook pleaded guilty in the case after Timothy G. Gregory made the same plea on Oct. 4. Cook resigned from the TSA in February, but not before recruiting Gregory to participate in the drug smuggling operation. Prosecutors say Cook introduced Gregory to undercover officers and received a $1,000 "finder's fee."

    WSB: 2nd ATL TSA agent pleads guilty

    TSA Agent Richard Cook, 27, admitted he twice smuggled what he thought was heroin past the security checkpoint at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport in January, netting himself $15,000. But the drugs were fake and the cartel members he thought he was working for were really law officers.

    FBI Press Release: Ex-TSA Officer Pleads Guilty to Attempting to Smuggle Drugs Through Hartsfield-Jackson

    U.S. Attorney’s Office October 17, 2012
    Northern District of Georgia (404) 581-6000

    ATLANTA—Ex-TSA Officer Richard C. Cook, II, 27, of Henry County, Georgia, pleaded guilty today to attempting to smuggle drugs through Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport, announced Sally Quillian Yates, United States Attorney for the Northern District of Georgia.
    United States Attorney Sally Quillian Yates said, “As a TSA agent, Mr. Cook was supposed to be working to keep air travel safe. Instead, he sold his badge and smuggled what he believed to be heroin through the world’s busiest airport. Now, he is a convicted felon.”

    James E Ward, Special Agent in Charge, Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector General (OIG), Atlanta Field Office, stated, “We are pleased with Mr. Cooks’ guilty plea. DHS-OIG hopes this sends a clear message that there is no place among dedicated professional of DHS for anyone who so shamelessly defies federal law. Mr. Cook will answer for his criminal activities.”

    Assistant Chief Deputy United States Marshal Chris Atwater said, “Mr. Cook abused his authority and violated the public’s trust. His convictions on these charges will deter other officers from this type of illegal activity and reassure the public that the unified law enforcement team in this district will not stand for such.”

    According to United States Attorney Yates, the charges, and other information presented in court: Beginning in January 2012, on multiple occasions, Cook misused his position as an officer with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to smuggle what he believed to be illegal drugs through Atlanta’s airport security.

    More specifically, on January 11, 2012, Cook met with two undercover officers, both of whom were posing as drug cartel members. During the meeting, the undercover officers provided Cook with three kilograms of fake drugs that Cook believed to be heroin and $3,500 in cash, which was partial payment to Cook to smuggle the fake drugs through airport security. Thereafter, Cook, who was wearing his TSA uniform, went to the airport, transported the sham drugs through the TSA security checkpoint, and delivered the sham drugs to an undercover officer inside the terminal. Cook was then paid another $4,000 in cash, which was the remaining payment for smuggling the sham drugs through security.

    Similarly, on January 26, 2012, Cook met with an undercover officer before Cook reported for his TSA shift at the airport. During this meeting, the undercover officer provided Cook with three kilograms of fake drugs that Cook believed to be heroin and $4,000 in cash, which was partial payment to Cook to smuggle the fake drugs through airport security. Thereafter, Cook, who was wearing his TSA uniform, went to the airport, transported the fake kilograms through the TSA security checkpoint, and delivered the sham drugs to another undercover officer in the terminal. The undercover officer then paid Cook $3,500, which was the remaining portion of Cook’s fee for smuggling the sham drugs through security. In both sting operations, Cook believed that he was smuggling heroin through airport security.

    In February 2012, Cook resigned from the TSA. However, Cook recruited fellow TSA Officer Timothy G. Gregory to assist with the drug smuggling operation. Cook introduced Gregory to the undercover officers who were posing as drug traffickers, and received a referral fee of $1,000.

    On February 24, 2012, an undercover officer provided Gregory with five kilograms of fake cocaine and $5,000 in cash. Thereafter, Gregory, who was wearing his TSA uniform, went to the airport, transported the fake cocaine through the TSA security checkpoint, and delivered the sham drugs to another undercover officer in the terminal.

    On October 4, 2012, Gregory pleaded to guilty conspiring and attempting to smuggle drugs through Atlanta’s airport. His sentencing is scheduled for December 18, 2012, at 10:30 a.m. before United States District Judge Charles A. Pannell, Jr.

    Cook’s sentencing is scheduled for January 3, 2013, at 10:30, before United States District Judge Charles A. Pannell, Jr. Cook could receive a maximum sentence of life in prison and a fine of up to $10,000,000. In determining the actual sentence, the court will consider the United States Sentencing Guidelines, which are not binding but provide appropriate sentencing ranges for most offenders.

    This case is being investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Homeland Security-Office of the Inspector General, and the United States Marshals Service.

    Assistant United States Attorney Jeffrey W. Davis is prosecuting the case.

    The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Atlanta recommends parents and children learn about the dangers of drugs at the following website: www.justthinktwice.com.

    For further information please contact the U.S. Attorney’s Public Information Office at USAGAN.Pressemails@usdoj.gov or (404) 581-6016. The Internet address for the homepage for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia is www.justice.gov/usao/gan.
     
  11. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Hi, ho!
    Hi, Ho!
    It's up the river
    We go!
    We go!

    FBI: Ex-TSA Officer Sentenced for Conspiring to Smuggle Drugs Through Hartsfield-Jackson

    U.S. Attorney’s Office January 30, 2013
    • Northern District of Georgia (404) 581-6000
    ATLANTA—Two now-former TSA officers who conspired and attempted to smuggle drugs through Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport security have been sentenced by United States District Judge Charles Pannell. Today, Richard C. Cook, II, 28, of Henry County, Georgia, was sentenced to 11 years in prison; and on January 4, 2013, Timothy G. Gregory, 26, of DeKalb County, Georgia, was sentenced to six years in prison.

    United States Attorney Sally Quillian Yates said, “The defendants abused their positions as TSA officers to smuggle drugs through the world’s busiest airport. The citizens of this district deserve better than Mr. Cook and Mr. Gregory—they deserve officers who obey the laws that they are entrusted to enforce. These significant prison sentences should serve as stinging reminders that corruption will not be tolerated.”

    James E. Ward, Special Agent in Charge, Department of Homeland Security, Office of the Inspector General (OIG), Atlanta Field Office stated, “Let today’s sentencing demonstrate to the public that federal and local law enforcement agencies stand committed to eradicate corruption, particularly among the few who choose to tarnish their badge and oath of office. DHS-OIG and its law enforcement partners will continue to hold such shameless individuals accountable.”

    Mark F. Giuliano, Special Agent in Charge, FBI Atlanta Field Office, stated, “As officers of TSA, these two defendants abandoned their positions of trust, and today, they will answer for their actions. The FBI remains committed in working with its various law enforcement partners in bringing forward for prosecutions all matters concerning public corruption.”

    According to United States Attorney Yates, the charges, and other information presented in court: Beginning in January 2012, on multiple occasions, Cook and Gregory misused their positions as officers with the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) to smuggle what they believed to be illegal drugs through Atlanta’s airport security.

    The investigation began after authorities received information from various sources that Cook was willing to use his position to smuggle contraband into secure facilities. Based on that information, federal law enforcement officers initiated an investigation into Cook’s activities. Specifically, on January 11, 2012, Cook met with two undercover officers, both of whom were posing as drug cartel members. During the meeting, the undercover officers provided Cook with three kilograms of fake drugs, which Cook believed to be heroin, and $3,500 in cash, which was partial payment to Cook to smuggle the drugs through airport security. Thereafter, Cook, who was wearing his TSA uniform, went to the airport, transported the drugs through the TSA security checkpoint, and delivered the drugs to an undercover officer inside the terminal. Cook was then paid another $4,000 in cash, which was the remaining payment for smuggling the drugs through security.

    Similarly, on January 26, 2012, Cook met with an undercover officer before reporting for his TSA shift at the airport. During this meeting, the undercover officer provided Cook with three kilograms of fake drugs that Cook believed to be heroin and $4,000 in cash, which was partial payment to Cook to smuggle the drugs through airport security. Thereafter, Cook, who was wearing his TSA uniform, went to the airport, transported the drugs through the TSA security checkpoint, and delivered the drugs to another undercover officer in the terminal. The undercover officer then paid Cook $3,500, which was the remaining portion of Cook’s fee for smuggling the drugs through security. In both sting operations, Cook believed that he was smuggling heroin through airport security.

    In February 2012, Cook resigned from the TSA. However, Cook recruited TSA Officer Gregory to assist with the drug smuggling operation. Cook introduced Gregory to the undercover officers who were posing as drug traffickers and received a referral fee of $1,000.

    On February 24, 2012, an undercover officer provided Gregory with five kilograms of fake cocaine and $5,000 in cash. Thereafter, Gregory, who was wearing his TSA uniform, went to the airport, transported the cocaine through the TSA security checkpoint, and delivered the drugs to another undercover officer in the terminal.

    On May 4, 2012, undercover officers provided Gregory with 10 kilograms of fake cocaine, which Gregory had agreed to transport from Atlanta to Commerce, Georgia.

    Today, Cook was sentenced to 11 years in prison, to be followed by five years of supervised release, and fined $16,000. On January 4, 2013, Gregory was sentenced to six years in prison, to be followed by five years of supervised release, and fined $5,000.

    This case was investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Department of Homeland Security-Office of the Inspector General, and the United States Marshals Service.

    Assistant United States Attorney Jeffrey W. Davis prosecuted this case.

    The U.S. Attorney’s Office in Atlanta recommends parents and children learn about the dangers of drugs at the following website: www.justthinktwice.com.

    For further information please contact the U.S. Attorney’s Public Information Office at USAGAN.Pressemails@usdoj.gov or (404) 581-6016. The Internet address for the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia is www.justice.gov/usao/gan.
     
  12. N965VJ

    N965VJ Original Member

    Hey Richie and Timmy - some advice - don't reach down to pick up the soap in a prison shower! :eek::p
     
  13. Fisher1949

    Fisher1949 Original Member Coach

    These petty thugs will be way out of their league in prison. I hope some "justice" is served in there.
     
  14. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    I was going to suggest they email Frank for some tips on how to become that special girl. With 6-11 years ahead of them, they could settle down into some meaningful long-term relationships.
     
  15. Frank

    Frank Original Member

    Now if we could just get a law passed that told TSA any of their Freedom Fluffers that get arrested can't be replaced. TSA loses that position number permanently.
     

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