Why Did I Have To Go To Pravda To Get My Op-Ed About TSA Rape Published?

Discussion in 'Aviation Passenger Security in the USA' started by Lisa Simeone, Dec 21, 2011.

  1. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Why Did I Have To Go To Pravda To Get My Op-Ed About TSA Rape Published?

    Blogger and civil liberties defender Amy Alkon had to go to Pravda -- yes, that Pravda -- to get her TSA op-ed published. She'd been trying for months to get a mainstream American newspaper to publish it, with no luck. And she has connections in the media. But nobody would touch it.

    Since I love to sing, and I love Christmas time, and Christmas is a time for singing, and the TSA is even singing at airports, that is, when they take a break from sticking their hands down people's pants, sing along with me:

    "Fa la la la la, (expletive deleted)*k the TSA!"
     
    Fisher1949 likes this.
  2. We're truly in bizarro world now.
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    In the post-Soviet Russia, Pravda has to compete on equal footing with other media outlets. I don't seek them out for news, but the articles I've run across in recent years seem well presented & balanced -- they are not the party propaganda rag that they used to be.
     
  4. I agree, but the irony is astounding.
     
  5. jtodd

    jtodd Original Member

    Isn't it?! It is astounding that to get articles like this posted, somebody has to post via an old Soviet era news agency. Disgusting what is happening to this country! Bizarro world. If it were not something as serious as basic rights, I might be able to laugh or crack jokes. As is, it just fuels the anger, which can be useful.
     
  6. KrazyKat

    KrazyKat Original Member

    If you haven't checked it out, you really should:
    which might be a worthwhile use of (benign) talent among the ranks.
     
  7. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    We truly are.
     
  8. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    Do you happen to know if she's on Twitter? She should tweet something to that effect. We could all RT her and see how far we can take it. Maybe some of the msm will be humiliated enough that someone will publish it.
     
  9. Fisher1949

    Fisher1949 Original Member Coach

    The real story now is that the mainstream media won't touch the story. I wonder if they'll now report that they didn't report a story?

    Bizzaro indeed.
     
  10. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Yes, she's on Twitter and has already tweeted her story and is getting some play.
     
  11. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

  12. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Love it!!!
     
  13. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Amy finally got a U.S. newspaper to publish her op-ed -- the Orange County Register:


    You have to be on FB to leave comments, which I'm not so I can't. Have at it!
     
  14. RB

    RB Founding Member

    Is there any possible chance that Amy could sue the individual screener for assault? If gential contact is not required or authorized by TSA then I don't see how any worker protections could help the screener.
     
  15. Lisa Simeone

    Lisa Simeone Original Member

    Have no idea. You can ask her at her blog -- advicegoddess.com .

    Since so many thousands of people have been similarly assaulted, you'd think someone would be pursuing this. But I haven't heard anything to that effect. The only time it was taken seriously was when D.A. Steve Wagstaffe in California said he would criminally charge any TSA agent who assaulted a passenger, but the legal definition of "assault" in these cases is so tortured, nobody could ever make such a charge stick. That's my layman's reading of it anyway.

     
  16. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    I liked this note at the end of her op-ed:

    NOTE: Top First Amendment lawyer Marc J. Randazza called the TSA agent's case "meritless" on First Amendment grounds (and SLAPP grounds, as well). Other lawyers and legal scholars have concurred.

    Accordingly, there's been no court filing and no contact since the initial letter in late July from the TSA agent's lawyer, Vicki Roberts, a publicity seeker who hopes to have her own reality show. See Roberts' site, RestMyCase.com, and press releases like this one Roberts sent out about herself: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2008/03/prweb786194.htm

    I'm sure Roberts' lawyer is loving that site - I say sarcastically. ;)
     
  17. Mike

    Mike Founding Member Coach

    Unfortunately there's no clear-cut date for the implementation of the FBI's new reporting guidelines, but here my suggestion for any female who still insists on flying and who could use an extra $50K or more.

    1. Have your lawyer lined up.​
    2. Refuse any Nude-O-Scoping, wear long loose-fitting skirts & under-wire bras, etc. You get the picture. :D
    3. When it's time for the love pats (thank you for your eloquent descriptions, Ms. Carnahan) that you tried so hard to get, say, "I do not consent to being raped."​
    4. Lather, rinse, repeat steps 1-3 until you receive something that meets the FBI's new definition of rape.​
    5. Sue the bums.​

    Somebody needs to make a effort for this to happen. If we just wait for a random pax to be graped & sue, it might be a while, a long while.

    And a suggestion for Sunny Goth & other attorneys who might be reading this -- perhaps refine the idea a bit (obviously I'm not looking at it from the background of a plaintiff's attorney), and as you network with your fellow attorneys, seek out those who are good with sexual harassment & assault issues and try to plant the idea. This will work just as well if an attorney recruits the victim as the other way around.
     
    Lisa Simeone likes this.
  18. Sunny Goth

    Sunny Goth Original Member Coach

    Yeah, it's a tricky thing - and it requires a lot of patience, and the plaintiff in a case like this will need to be sympathetic. It shouldn't have to be that way, but in reality it is.

    > Somebody needs to make a effort for this to happen. If we just wait for a random pax to be graped & sue, it might be a while, a long while.

    I agree.

    >>2. Refuse any Nude-O-Scoping, wear long loose-fitting skirts & under-wire bras, etc. You get the picture. :D
    >> 3. When it's time for the love pats (thank you for your eloquent descriptions, Ms. Carnahan) that you tried so hard to get, say, "I do not consent to being raped."​

    These are two of the tricky parts. Whoever the plaintiff is, they need to be wearing the clothes they would always wear. If they don't tend to wear long loose-fitting skirts, then they shouldn't wear them on this occasion either. You don't want it to look like a set-up. Besides, Amy was wearing pants for heaven sakes, and look what happened to her! :(

    I'm not a defense attorney in that sense, so I don't know if saying "I don't consent to being raped" would help or harm the case. If you're going through the pat-down, you arguably are consenting to the search, you most certainly aren't consenting to rape.

    But yeah, in general, I agree.
     
  19. RB

    RB Founding Member

    I see no reason that would prohibit a group of people from testing the system as many times as needed to collect information. If TSA isn't doing anything wrong they shouldn't care one way or the other why people are flying or going to airside clubs.
     
  20. N965VJ

    N965VJ Original Member

    Note to self: If legal advice is needed, do not hire Gary Busey's lawyer. :eek::p
     

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